1 ... 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ... 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 17

bet17/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
) of the diagonal Y
diag
⊂ Y ×Y equal X
diag
⊂ X ×X,
[33].

MANIFOLDS
123
(2) One can apply all of the above to p parametric families of maps X
→ Y ,
by paying the price of the extra p in the excess of dim
(Y ) over dim(X),
[33].
If p
= 1, this yield an isotopy classification of embeddings X → Y for
3k
> n + 3 by homotopies of the above symmetric maps X × X → Y × Y ,
which shows, for example, that there are no knots for these dimensions
(Haefliger, 1961). If 3k
> n + 3, then every smooth embedding S
n
−k
→ R
n
is smoothly isotopic to the standard S
n
−k
⊂ R
n
.
But if 3k
= n + 3 and k = 2l + 1 is odd then there are infinitely many
isotopy of classes of embeddings S
4l
−1
→ R
6l
(Haefliger 1962).
Non-triviality of such a knot S
4l
−1
→ R
6l
is detected by showing that a map
f
0
∶ B
4l
→ R
6l
× R
+
extending S
4l
−1
= ∂(B
4l
) cannot be turned into an embedding,
keeping it transversal to
R
6l
= R
6l
× 0 and with its boundary equal our knot S
4l
−1

R
6l
.
The Whitney-Haefliger W for f
0
has dimension 6l
+ 1 − 2(2l + 1) + 2 = 2l + 1 and,
generically, it transversally intersects B
4l
at several points.
The resulting (properly defined) intersection index of W with B is non-zero
(otherwise one could eliminate these points by Whitney) and it does not depend on
f
0
. In fact, it equals the linking invariant of Haefliger. (This is reminiscent of the
“higher linking products” described by Sullivan’s minimal models, see Section 9.)
(3) In view of he above, one must be careful if one wants to relax the dimension
constraint by an inductive application of the Whitney-Haefliger disengag-
ing procedure, since obstructions/invariants for removal “higher” intersec-
tions which come on the way may be not so apparent. (The structure of
“higher self-intersections” of this kind for Euclidean hypersurfaces carries
a significant information on the stable homotopy groups of spheres.)
But this is possible, at least on the
Q-level, where one has a compre-
hensive algebraic control of self-intersections of all multiplicities for maps
of codimension k
≥ 3. Also, even without tensoring with Q, the higher
intersection obstructions tend to vanish in the combinatorial category.
For example, there are no combinatorial knots of codimension k
≥ 3
(Zeeman, 1963).
The essential mechanism of knotting X
= X
n
⊂ Y = Y
n
+2
depends on the
fundamental group Γ of the complement U
= Y ⊂ X. The group Γ may look a
nuisance when you want to untangle a knot, especially a surface X
2
in a 4-manifold,
but these Γ
= Γ(X) for various X ⊂ Y form beautifully intricate patterns which are
poorly understood.
For example, the groups Γ
= π
1
(U) capture the ´etale cohomology of algebraic
manifolds and the Novikov-Pontryagin classes of topological manifolds (see section
10). Possibly, the groups Γ
(X
2
) for surfaces X
2
⊂ Y
4
have much to tell us about
the smooth topology of 4-manifolds.
There are few systematic ways of constructing “simple” X
⊂ Y , e.g. immersed
submanifolds, with “interesting” (e.g. far from being free) fundamental groups of
their complements.
Offhand suggestions are pullbacks of (special singular) divisors X
0
in complex
algebraic manifolds Y
0
under generic maps Y
→ Y
0
and immersed subvarieties X
n
in cubically subdivided Y
n
+2
, where X
n
are made of n-sub-cubes

n
inside the

124
MIKHAIL GROMOV
cubes

n
+2
⊂ Y
n
+2
and where these interior

n
⊂ ◻
n
+2
are parallel to the n-faces of

n
+2
.
It remains equally unclear what is the possible topology of self-intersections of
immersions X
n
→ Y
n
+2
, say for S
3
→ S
5
, where the self-intersection makes a link
in S
3
, and for S
4
→ S
6
where this is an immersed surface in S
4
.
(4) One can control the position of the image of f
new
(X) ⊂ Y , e.g. by mak-
ing it to land in a given open subset W
0
⊂ W , if there is no homotopy
obstruction to this.
The above generalizes and simplifies in the combinatorial or “piecewise smooth”
category, e.g. for “unknotting spheres”, where the basic construction is as follows
Theorem
(Engulfing). Let X be a piecewise smooth polyhedron in a smooth
manifold Y . If n
− k = dim(X) ≤ dim(Y ) − 3 and if π
i
(Y ) = 0 for i = 1, ...dim(Y ),
then there exists a smooth isotopy F
t
of Y which eventually (for t
= 1) moves X to
a given (small) neighbourhood B

of a point in Y
Sketch of the Proof.
Start with a generic f
t
. This f
t
does the job away
from a certain W which has dim
(W ) ≤ n−2k+2. This is < dim(X) under the above
assumption and the proof proceeds by induction on dim
(X).
This is called “engulfing” since B

, when moved by the time reversed isotopy,
engulfs X; engulfing was invented by Stallings in his approach to the Poincar´
e
Conjecture in the combinatorial category, which goes, roughly, as follows.
Let Y be a smooth n-manifold.
Then, with a simple use of two mutually
dual smooth triangulations of Y , one can decompose Y , for each i, into the union
of regular neighbourhoods U
1
and U
2
of smooth subpolyhedra X
1
and X
2
in Y of
dimensions i and n
−i−1 (similarly to the handle body decomposition of a 3-manifold
into the union of two thickened graphs in it), where, recall, a neighbourhood U of
an X
⊂ Y is regular if there exists an isotopy f
t
∶ U → U which brings all of U
arbitrarily close to X.
Now let Y be a homotopy sphere of dimension n
≥ 7, say n = 7, and let i = 3
Then X
1
and X
2
, and hence U
1
and U
2
, can be engulfed by (diffeomorphic images
of) balls, say by B
1
⊃ U
1
and B
2
⊃ U
2
with their centers denoted 0
1
∈ B
1
and
0
2
∈ B
2
.
By moving the 6-sphere ∂
(B
1
) ⊂ B
2
by the radial isotopy in B
2
toward 0
2
, one
represents Y
∖ 0
2
by the union of an increasing sequence of isotopic copies of the
ball B
1
. This implies (with the isotopy theorem) that Y
∖ 0
2
is diffeomorphic to
R
7
, hence, Y is homeomorphic to S
7
.
(A refined generalization of this argument delivers the Poincar´
e conjecture in
the combinatorial and topological categories for n
≥ 5. See [66] for an account
of techniques for proving various “Poincar´
e conjectures” and for references to the
source papers.)
8. Handles and h-Cobordisms
The original approach of Smale to the Poincar´
e conjecture depends on handle
decompositions of manifolds—counterparts to cell decompositions in the homotopy
theory.
Such decompositions are more flexible, and by far more abundant than trian-
gulations and they are better suited for a match with algebraic objects such as

MANIFOLDS
125
homology. For example, one can sometimes realize a basis in homology by suit-
ably chosen cells or handles which is not even possible to formulate properly for
triangulations.
Recall that an i-handle of dimension n is the ball B
n
decomposed into the
product B
n
= B
i
× B
n
−i
(ε) where one think of such a handle as an ε-thickening of
the unit i-ball and where
A
(ε) = S
i
× B
n
−1
(ε) ⊂ S
n
−1
= ∂B
n
is seen as an ε-neighbourhood of its axial
(i − 1)-sphere S
i
−1
× 0 – an equatorial
i-sphere in S
n
−1
.
If X is an n-manifold with boundary Y and f
∶ A(ε) → Y a smooth embedding,
one can attach B
n
to X by f and the resulting manifold (with the “corner” along
∂A
(ε) made smooth) is denoted X +
f
B
n
or X
+
S
i
−1
B
n
, where the latter subscript
refers to the f -image of the axial sphere in Y .
The effect of this on the boundary, i.e. modification

(X) = Y ↝
f
Y

= ∂(X +
S
i
−1
B
n
)
does not depend on X but only on Y and f . It is called an i-surgery of Y at the
sphere f
(S
i
−1
× 0) ⊂ Y .
The manifold X
= Y × [0, 1] +
S
i
−1
B
n
, where B
n
is attached to Y
× 1, makes
a bordism between Y
= Y × 0 and Y

which equals the surgically modified Y
× 1-
component of the boundary of X. If the manifold Y is oriented, so is X, unless i
= 1
and the two ends of the 1-handle B
1
× B
n
−1
(ε) are attached to the same connected
component of Y with opposite orientations.
When we attach an i-handle to an X along a zero-homologous sphere S
i
−1
⊂ Y ,
we create a new i-cycle in X
+
S
i
−1
B
n
; when we attach an
(i + 1)-handle along an
i-sphere in X which is non-homologous to zero, we “kill” an i-cycle.
These creations/annihilations of homology may cancel each other and a handle
decomposition of an X may have by far more handles (balls) than the number of
independent homology classes in H

(X).
Smale’s argument proceeds in two steps.
(1) The overall algebraic cancellation is decomposed into “elementary steps”
by “reshuffling” handles (in the spirit of J.H.C. Whitehead’s theory of the
simple homotopy type);
(2) each elementary step is implemented geometrically as in the example be-
low (which does not elucidate the case n
= 6).
Cancelling a 3-handle by a 4-handle. Let X
= S
3
×B
4

0
) and let us attach
the 4-handle B
7
= B
4
×B
3
(ε), ε << ε
0
, to the (normal) ε-neighbourhood A

of some
sphere
S
3

⊂ Y = ∂(X) = S
3
× S
3

0
) for S
3

0
) = ∂B
4

0
).
by some diffeomorphism of A
(ε) ⊂ ∂(B
7
) onto A

.
If S
3

= S
3
× b
0
, b
0
∈ S
3

0
), is the standard sphere, then the resulting X

=
X
+
S
3

B
7
is obviously diffeomorphic to B
7
: adding S
3
× B
4

0
) to B
7
amounts to
“bulging” the ball B
7
over the ε-neighbourhood A
(ε) of the axial 3-sphere on its
boundary.
Another way to see it is by observing that this addition of S
3
× B
4

0
) to B
7
can be decomposed into gluing two balls in succession to B
7
as follows.

126
MIKHAIL GROMOV
Take a ball B
3
(δ) ⊂ S
3
around some point s
0
∈ S
3
and decompose X
= S
3
×
B
4

0
) into the union of two balls that are
B
7
δ
= B
3
(δ) × B
4

0
)
and
B
7
1
−δ
= B
3
(1 − δ) × B
4

0
) for B
3
(1 − δ) =
def
S
3
∖ B
3
(δ).
Clearly, the attachment loci of B
7
1
−δ
to X and of B
7
δ
to X
+ B
7
1
−δ
are diffeomor-
phic (after smoothing the corners) to the 6-ball.
Let us modify the sphere S
3
×b
0
⊂ S
3
×B
4

0
) = ∂(X) by replacing the original
standard embedding of the 3-ball
B
3
(1 − δ) → B
7
1
−δ
= B
3
(1 − δ) × S
3

0
) ⊂ ∂(X)
by another one, say,
f

∶ B
3
(1 − δ) → B
7
1
−δ
= B
3
(1 − δ) × S
3

0
) = ∂(X),
such that f

equals the original embedding near the boundary of ∂
(B
3
(1 − δ)) =

(B
3
(δ)) = S
2
(δ).
Then the same “ball after ball” argument applies, since the first gluing site
where B
7
1
−δ
is being attached to X, albeit “wiggled”, remains diffeomorphic to B
6
by the isotopy theorem, while the second one does not change at all. So we conclude
the following.
Whenever S
3

⊂ S
3
× S
3

0
) transversally intersect s
0
× S
3

0
),
s
0
∈ S
3
, at a single point, the manifold X

= X +
S
3

B
7
is diffeo-
morphic to B
7
.
Finally, by Whitney’s lemma, every embedding S
3
→ S
3
× S
3

0
) ⊂ S
3
× B
4

0
)
which is homologous in S
3
× B
4

0
) to the standard S
3
× b
0
⊂ S
3
× B
4

0
), can be
isotoped to another one which meets s
0
× S
3

0
) transversally at a single point.
Hence the following.
The handles do cancel one another: if a sphere
S
3

⊂ S
3
× S
3

0
) = ∂(X) ⊂ X = S
3
× B
4

0
),
is homologous in X to
S
3
× b
0
⊂ X = S
3
× B
4

0
), b
0
∈ B
4
(ε),
then the manifold X
+
S
3

B
7
is diffeomorphic to the 7-ball.
Let us show in this picture that Milnor’s sphere Σ
7
minus a small ball is diffeomor-
phic to B
7
. Recall that Σ
7
is fibered over S
4
, say by p
∶ Σ
7
→ S
4
, with S
3
-fibers
and with the Euler number e
= ±1.
Decompose S
4
into two round balls with the common S
3
-boundary, S
4
= B
4
+

B
4

. Then Σ
7
decomposes into X
+
= p
−1
(B
4
+
) = B
4
+
×S
3
and X

= p
−1
(B
4

) = B
4

×S
3
,
where the gluing diffeomorphism between the boundaries ∂
(X
+
) = S
3
+
× S
3
and

(X

) = S
3

× S
3
for S
3
±
= ∂B
4
±
, is homologically the same as for the Hopf fibration
S
7
→ S
4
for e
= ±1.
Therefore, if we decompose the S
3
-factor of B
4

× S
3
into two round balls, say
S
3
= B
3
1
∪ B
3
2
, then either B
4

× B
3
1
or B
4

× B
3
2
makes a 4-handle attached to X
+
to
which the handle cancellation applies and shows that X
+
∪ (B
4

× B
3
1
) is a smooth
7-ball. (All what is needed of the Whitney’s lemma is obvious here: the zero section

MANIFOLDS
127
X
⊂ V in an oriented R
2k
-bundle V
→ X = X
2k
with e
(V ) = ±1 can be perturbed
to X

⊂ V which transversally intersect X at a single point.)
The handles shaffling/cancellation techniques do not solve the existence prob-
lem for diffeomorphisms Y
↔ Y

but rather reduce it to the existence of h-cobordisms
between manifolds, where a compact manifold X with two boundary components
Y and Y

is called an h-cobordism (between Y and Y

) if the inclusion Y
⊂ X is a
homotopy equivalence.
Theorem
(Smale h-Cobordism Theorem). If an h-cobordism has dim
(X) ≥ 6
and π
1
(X) = 1 then X is diffeomorphic to Y × [0, 1], by a diffeomorphism keeping
Y
= Y × 0 ⊂ X fixed. In particular, h-cobordant simply connected manifolds of
dimensions
≥ 5 are diffeomorphic.
Notice that the Poincar´
e conjecture for the homotopy spheres Σ
n
, n
≥ 6, follows
by applying this to Σ
n
minus two small open balls, while the case m
= 1 is solved
by Smale with a construction of an h-cobordism between Σ
5
and S
5
.
Also Smale’s handle techniques deliver the following geometric version of the
Poincar´
e connectedness/contractibilty correspondence (see Section 4).
Let X be a closed n-manifold, n
≥ 5, with π
i
(X) = 0, i = 1, ..., k.
Then X contains a
(n−k−1)-dimensional smooth sub-polyhedron
P
⊂ X, such that the complement of the open (regular) neigh-
bourhood U
ε
(P ) ⊂ X of P is diffeomorphic to the n-ball, (where
the boundary ∂
(U
ε
) is the (n − 1)-sphere “ε-collapsed” onto
P
= P
n
−k−1
).
If n
= 5 and if the normal bundle of X embedded into some R
5
+N
is trivial, i.e.
if the normal Gauss map of X to the Grassmannian Gr
(R
5
+N
) is contractible, then
Smale proves, assuming π
1
(X) = 1, that one can choose P = P
3
⊂ X = X
5
that
equals the union of a smooth topological segment s
= [0, 1] ⊂ X and several spheres
S
2
i
and S
3
i
, where each S
3
i
meets s at one point, and also transversally intersects
S
2
i
at a single point and where there are no other intersections between s, S
2
i
and
S
3
i
. In other words,
(Smale 1965) X is diffeomorphic to the connected sum of several
copies of S
2
× S
3
.
The triviality of the bundle in this theorem is needed to ensure that all embedded
2-spheres in X have trivial normal bundles, i.e. their normal neighbourhoods split
into S
2
× R
3
which comes handy when you play with handles.
If one drops this triviality condition, one has
Theorem
(Classification of Simply Connected 5-Manifolds. Barden 1966).
There is a finite list of explicitly constructed 5-manifolds X
i
, such that every closed
simply connected manifold X is diffeomorphic to the connected sum of X
i
.
This is possible, in view of the above Smale theorem, since all simply con-
nected 5-manifolds X have “almost trivial” normal bundles e.g. their only possible
Pontryagin class p
1
∈ H
4
(X) is zero. Indeed π
1
(X) = 1 implies that H
1
(X) =
π
1
(X)/[π
1
(X), π
1
(X)] = 0 and then H
4
(X) = H
1
(X) = 0 by the Poincar´e duality.
When you encounter bordisms, the generecity sling launches you to the strato-
sphere of algebraic topology so fast that you barely discern the geometric string
attached to it.

128
MIKHAIL GROMOV
Smale’s cells and handles, on the contrary, feel like slippery amebas which
merge and disengage as they reptate in the swamp of unruly geometry, where n-
dimensional cells continuously collapse to lower dimensional ones and keep squeez-
ing through paper-thin crevices. Yet, their motion is governed, for all we know, by
the rules dictated by some algebraic K-theory (theories?)
This motion hardly can be controlled by any traditional geometric flow. First
of all, the “simply connected” condition cannot be encoded in geometry ([52], [28]
[53] and also breaking the symmetry by dividing a manifold into handles along with
“genericity” poorly fare in geometry.
Yet, some generalized “Ricci flow with partial collapse and surgeries” in the
“space of (generic, random?) amebas” might split away whatever it fails to untangle
and bring fresh geometry into the picture.
For example, take a compact locally symmetric space X
0
= S/Γ, where S is a
non-compat irreducible symmetric space of rank
≥ and make a 2-surgery along some
non-contractible circle S
1
⊂ X
0
. The resulting manifold X has finite fundamental
group by Margulis’ theorem and so a finite covering ˜
X
→ X is simply connected.
What can a geometric flow do to these X
0
and ˜
X? Would it bring X back to X
0
?
9. Manifolds under Surgery
The Atiyah–Thom construction and Serre’s theory allows one to produce “ar-
bitrarily large” manifolds X for the m-domination X
1

m
X
2
, m
> 0, meaning that
there is a map f
∶ X
1
→ X
2
of degree m.
Every such f between closed connected oriented manifolds induces a surjec-
tive homomorphisms f
∗i
∶ H
i
(X
1
;
Q) → H
i
(X
1
;
Q) for all i = 0, 1, ..., n, (as we
know from section 4), or equivalently, an injective cohomology homomorphism
f
∗i
∶ H
i
(X
2
;
Q) → H
i
(X
2
;
Q).
Indeed, by the Poincar´
e
Q-duality, the cup-product (this the common name for
the product on cohomology) pairing H
i
(X
2
;
Q) ⊗ H
n
−i
(X
2
;
Q) → Q = H
n
(X
2
;
Q)
is faithful; therefore, if f
∗i
vanishes, then so does f
∗n
. But the latter amounts to
multiplication by m
= deg(f),
H
n
(X


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-scientific-and-99.html

the-scientist-169-32--apr.html

the-scottish-highlands.html

the-search-for-r-krishna.html

the-second-internatonal.html