1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 4

bet4/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
rior of each cell is diffeomorphic to an open ball). Poincar´
e then argues that the
associated homology is unchanged if one passes from such a polyhedral decompo-
sition to a polyhedral subdivision. Then he argues that any two such polyhedral
decompositions (which should be deformed slightly to be in general position) have
a common polyhedral subdivision and hence the homology associated with a de-
composition is in fact an invariant of the manifold independent of the polyhedral
decomposition. He makes a brief argument (that he returns to in more detail in
the next complement) to show that this homology is the same as the one computed
from closed submanifolds modulo boundaries in the ambient manifold. (Of course,
with hindsight we know that Poincar´
e was missing the crucial distinction between
cycles, which in general have to be singular, and submanifolds. This point was not
understood until Thom’s work [47].) The basic idea in Poincar´
e’s discussion is that
since any closed submanifold is the union of cells of some polyhedral decomposition
that cycle is accounted for in the homology computed using that decomposition,
which after all is independent of the decomposition. Thus, every closed manifold is
accounted for in the homology computed via a polyhedral decomposition. (Poincar´
e
has more to say about this later.)
At this point he is prepared for his proof of the duality theorem, which as
he states it says that the Betti numbers (computed using rational coefficients) of
a closed, orientable manifold in complementary degrees are equal. He argues as
follows: Begin with a polyhedral decomposition and take (what is now called) a
barycentric subdivision. One does this by adding a vertex v
a
in the relative interior
of each cell a, and for any string a
0
< a
1
<
· · · a
k
of cells each strictly included
in the boundary of the next, one constructs a k-dimensional ball inside a
k
with
the v
a
0
, . . . , v
a
k
as vertices.
These various balls are required to fit together in
the naturally consistent way so that they make a polyhedral decomposition which
subdivides the original decomposition. Once this barycentric subdivision is created,
one constructs the dual polyhedral decomposition to the original one. For each cell
a of the original decomposition one takes the union of all the cells of the barycentric
subdivision that meet a exactly in its vertex v
a
. The relative interior of this union
is diffeomorphic to a Euclidean space of dimension n
− k if a is k-dimensional
and the ambient manifold is n-dimensional. These submanifolds construct the dual
polyhedral cell decomposition. From this picture it is easy to conclude the duality of
the Betti numbers: The (n
−k)
th
Betti number of the dual polyhedral decomposition
is identified with the k
th
-Betti number of the original decomposition. But by the
invariance result, the (n
− k)
th
Betti number of the dual polyhedral decomposition
is identified with the (n
− k)
th
Betti number of the original decomposition.
Lastly, Poincar´
e remarks that this argument depends on being able to find a
polyhedral decomposition of any manifold into cells with interiors diffeomorphic to
open balls. He then gives a brief argument to establish this fact. In fact, he argues
that every smooth manifold has a decomposition into simplices (i.e., has a smooth
triangulation).
2.4. Second Complement (1900) [36]. Poincar´
e returns once again to the
homology associated with a polyhedral decomposition of a manifold (as always into

14
JOHN W. MORGAN
cells with interiors diffeomorphic to open balls); in particular he is concerned with
the relationship of the decomposition and the dual decomposition, which recall is
constructed by taking the barycentric subdivision of the original decomposition and
then associating to each cell a of the original decomposition the union of the cells
meeting a exactly in its barycenter.
Poincar´
e then presents the matrices giving the boundary operator of the chain
complex associated with the polyhedral decomposition. Using standard row and
column operations he diagonalizes this operator. From the matrices for the bound-
ary operator from q + 1 chains to q chains and that of the boundary operator from
q chains to q
− 1 chains he computes the q
th
Betti number as the difference of the
rank of the kernel of the latter and the rank of the image of the former. From the
matrix for the boundary operator from q-chains to (q
− 1)-chains he introduces the
torsion coefficients associated to the (q
−1)-homology group. These are the diagonal
entries > 1 of the diagonalized matrix for the boundary operator. He then remarks
that the difference between Heegaard’s definition of the Betti numbers (using the
integral coefficients) and his definition (using rational coefficients) is explained by
these torsion coefficients. In particular, the two definitions agree when there are no
torsion coefficients.
After giving some examples and analysing (only partially correctly) what ac-
counts for torsion in homology, Poincar´
e states the false result that an n-dimensional
closed, orientable manifold with all Betti numbers (except the 0
th
and the top one)
equal to zero and all torsion coefficients equal to zero is diffeomorphic to the n-
sphere. He announces the result and says that the proof requires further develop-
ments. It is not clear if he means that he knows how to do it and simply needs to
write down the details or whether it is still a proof in-progress. In any event he will
show in the fifth complement that this statement is false.
2.5. Third Complement (1902) [37]. This complement and the fourth con-
cern applications of the techniques and ideas of Analysis Situs to algebraic surfaces.
This complement takes up the study of the fundamental group of a complex alge-
braic surface S given by an equation of the form
z
2
= F (x, y),
where F (x, y) is a polynomial. Poincar´
e shows that if F (x, y) describes a smooth
curve then the resulting surface is simply connected. He does this by considering the
surface S as fibered over the y-plane with hyperelliptic curves as fibers with a certain
number of singular fibers. Removing the preimage of small disks in the y-plane
centered at each singular point, Poincar´
e arrives at a 4-manifold with boundary, S
0
which is fibered by hyperelliptic curves. The boundary components of this manifold
are 3-manifolds fibered over circles of the type he studied in an earlier complement.
He expresses the fundamental group of S
0
as an extension of a free fuchsian group
(the group of the punctured sphere given by y) by the fundamental group of the
fuchsian group corresponding to the hyperelliptic curve which is the fiber over the
base point. He then shows that putting back in the preimages of the disks around
the singular points in the y-plane produces a quotient of this group that is trivial.
2.6. Fourth Complement (1902) [38]. In the fourth complement Poincar´
e
continues his study of the topology of algebraic surfaces, concentrating in particular
on their homology. He considers the surfaces as displayed over the projective line
with the fibers being algebraic curves. Generically, these are smooth algebraic

100 YEARS OF TOPOLOGY
15
curves but the curves above a finite set of points, A
1
, . . . , A
n
, in the projective line
are singular. There is then the monodromy action (introduced earlier by Picard) of
the fundamental group of
CP
1
\ {A
1
, . . . , A
n
} on H
1
of the generic fiber. Poincar´
e
reduces the study of cycles of dimensions 1, 2, and 3 to a study of this action.
In this he foreshadows the analysis that Lefschetz carried out in the 1920s on the
topology of smooth algebraic varieties.
2.7. Fifth Complement (1905) [39]. The fifth complement is the one di-
rectly relevant to this conference. It is at the end of this long article that Poincar´
e
formulates the question that soon became known as the Poincar´
e Conjecture. But
before getting to that let me lay the groundwork by discussing what else one finds in
this article dedicated to the study of the topology of 3-manifolds. The main result
of the article is to give a counter-example to the statement he formulated in the
second complement; namely that a n-manifold with the homology of the n-sphere
is diffeomorphic to the n-sphere. The counter-example is a 3-manifold with the
homology of the 3-sphere but whose fundamental group is non-trivial, so it is not
diffeomorphic to S
3
. Immediately after giving this example, Poincar´
e says: “There
remains one question to treat: Is it possible that the fundamental group of [the
3-manifold] V is trivial yet V is not diffeomorphic to the sphere?” He goes on to
say, “But this question would take us too far afield.”
Poincar´
e studies the 3-manifold V by placing it in a Euclidean space and cutting
it by a family of equations of the form ϕ(x
1
, . . . , x
n
) = t, creating a family (de-
pending on t) of codimension-1 submanifolds with certain singular values. Poincar´
e
shows that generically the singular values are what today are called regular singular
points, and he introduces the index of each such singular point—introducing what
later become known as Morse theory. He studies the effect on homology of passing
a critical point of index 1 or 2 and shows exactly how the first homology of the
surface changes: If the index is two and if the vanishing cycle E (the circle in the
level surface just below the critical level that contracts to a point at the critical
level) is not homologous to zero then the cycles that persist are those that have zero
intersection number with E and there is one additional homology, namely E ∼
= 0,
so that as we pass this critical value the rank of the first homology of the level
surface decreases by 2.
In preparation for his study of 3-manifolds using a Morse decomposition,
Poincar´
e first turns to an analysis of curves on a Riemann surface.
He shows
that given two systems
{C
1
, . . . , C
2p
} and {C
1
, . . . , C
2p
} of simple closed curves on
a surface of genus p, each family generating the first homology, there is an equiva-
lence (self-diffeomorphism) of the surface carrying each C
i
to a curve homologous
to C
i
for every 1
≤ i ≤ 2p if and only if the intersection matrices satisfy
C
i
· C
j
2p
i,j=1
= C
i
· C
j
2p
i,j=1
.
Given this it is easy to see when a cycle, written as a linear combination of a basis
2p
i=1
a
i
C
i
is homologous to a simple closed curve. It is if and only if the cycle is
not divisible (i.e., if and only if the gcd of the coefficients a
i
is 1).
Poincar´
e then turns to the question of when a based cycle C is homotopic
(without preserving the basepoint) to a simple closed curve.
This question he
studies using 2-dimensional hyperbolic geometry, the Poincar´
e disk. The cycle C
determines an element in the fundamental group of the surface and , after endowing
the surface with a hyperbolic structure, this element is represented by a hyperbolic

16
JOHN W. MORGAN
transformation of the Poincar´
e disk. This hyperbolic motion has two fixed points α
and β on the circle at infinity. The condition that C be homotopic to an embedded
curve is that for no element T of the fundamental group are the points T α and T β on
the circle at infinity separated by α and β. Poincar´
e derives an analogous condition
for two simple closed curves on the surface to be homotopic to disjoint simple closed
curves. Again the answer is in terms of the fixed points of the hyperbolic motions
associated with the two curves. Notice that Poincar´
e’s approach to this purely
topological question about surfaces uses hyperbolic geometry rather than purely
topological arguments.
Poincar´
e then turns to the study of the solid handlebody V of genus p: this is
a compact 3-manifold with boundary, say Σ, having a Morse function with a single
critical point of index 0 and p critical points of index 1 and no higher index critical
points. He shows that the critical points contribute p simple closed curves on Σ
that bound p disjoint, properly embedded disks in V . Cutting V open along these
p disks results in a 3-ball and the boundary is the 2-sphere made up of the union
of Σ cut open along p simple closed curves and p disks. He then asks how many
different ways can we present the given handlebody V . Let the p boundary circles
in the original presentation be K
1
, . . . , K
p
and let the boundary circles in the second
presentation be K
1
, . . . , K
p
. The conditions that the K
i
must satisfy is (i) they are
simple closed curves, (ii) they are disjoint, (iii) they are homotopically trivial in V ,
and (iv) the cycles K
i
generate the kernel of the map H
1
(Σ)
→ H
1
(V ).
Now Poincar´
e turns to the study of a closed 3-manifold V . Using an appropriate
Morse function, he writes V as the union of two solid handlebodies V
and V
of genus, say, p. From the Morse function he produces two families of p curves
K
1
, . . . , K
p
and K
1
, . . . , K
p
on the separating surface Σ which is the boundary of
V and V . Each of the K
i
bounds a disk in V and analogously for the K
i
in V .
This means that there is a homeomorphism of Σ to the boundary of a handlebody
carrying the K
i
to a standard family of simple closed curves and similarly for
the family K
i
. The first thing he does with this presentation is to express the
fundamental group of V in terms of the fundamental group of the splitting surface
Σ. He first shows that any element of the fundamental group of V is represented
by a loop on Σ. Then he concludes that the fundamental group of V is the quotient
of the fundamental group of Σ by the relations [K
1
] =
· · · = [K
p
] = [K
1
] =
· · · = [K
p
] = identity. (Here, [K] means the conjugacy class in the fundamental
group represented by the simple closed curve K.) Of course, from this one can
immediately deduce the homology of the manifold: it is the group obtained by
abelianizing the quotient, or equivalently, beginning with the free abelian group
which is the first homology of Σ and adding the 2p relations above to this group.
Poincar´
e then reformulates the computation of the homology as the cokernel of
the intersection matrix between the K
i
and the K
j
. Varying the bases we can
arrange that this matrix is diagonal. The first Betti number is then the co-rank
of the matrix (p-rank) and the torsion coefficients of the first homology are read
off from the diagonal entries that are greater than one. In particular, the manifold
has trivial first homology if and only if the determinant of this intersection matrix
is
±1 and the first Betti number is non-zero if and only if the determinant of the
matrix is 0.
Poincar´
e is now ready to compute in an explicit example V . The genus of the
splitting surface Σ for V is 2 so that we are concerned with two families of two

100 YEARS OF TOPOLOGY
17
curves
{K
1
, K
2
} and {K
1
, K
2
} on a surface Σ of genus 2. These generate the two
handlebodies whose union is V . We can suppose that
{K
1
, K
2
} is the standard
family so that cutting Σ open along these simple closed curves gives a region which
can be identified with a thrice punctured disk D
0
in the plane. Then each of the
the curves K
1
and K
2
is given by drawing families of disjoint arcs on D
0
whose
boundary points match in pairs. Furthermore, the two families of arcs are disjoint
from each other. (There is the extra condition that when we cut Σ open along K
1
and K
2
we also get a surface diffeomorphic to the thrice punctured disk.) Figure 1
below is the picture that Poincar´
e drew in his text. Figure 2 (see next page) shows
the resulting curves K
1
, K
2
on the surface of genus 2.
Figure 1.
Poincar´
e’s figure
The intersection matrix between the two sets of curves is:
3
2
−2 −1
.
Since the determinant of this matrix is 1, it follows that the first homology is trivial;
i.e., the first Betti number is zero and there are no torsion coefficients.
How about the fundamental group? Poincar´
e computes this by a similar argu-
ment in non-abelian group theory. In modern language, we begin with the free group
on two generators α and β (dual respectively to K
1
and K
2
). The curves K
1
and
K
2
then give two elements in this free group and the quotient when these elements
are set equal to the trivial element is the fundamental group of V . The word that
K
i
gives is read off by taking the intersections in order (and with signs as powers) of

18
JOHN W. MORGAN
Figure 2.
Curves drawn on the surface
K
i
with K
1
and K
2
. Thus, the curve K
1
gives the word ααααβα
−1
β = α
4
βα
−1
β
and K
2
gives the word α
−1
βα
−1
β
−1
β
−1
= α
−1
βα
−1
β
−2
. (These words are deter-
mined only up to cyclic order depending on where on K
i
we choose to start. But
since we are setting the elements equal to the trivial element all choices lead to the
same quotient group.) We then have a presentation of the fundamental group of V
as
α, β

4
βα
−1
β = α
−1
βα
−1
β
−2
= 1 .
Adding the relation (α
−1
β)
2
= 1 we deduce that in the quotient group we have
α, β
|(α
−1
β)
2
= (β
−1
)
3
= α
5
= 1 .
Setting a = α
−1
β, b = β
−1
and c = α we get the standard presentation of the
(2, 3, 5) triangle group
a, b, c
|a
2
= b
3
= c
5
= abc = 1
inside SO(3). This group is the icosahedral group of order 60, denoted Γ
60
. Hence,
the fundamental group of the manifold V has a quotient which is this non-trivial
group and thus the fundamental group of V is non-trivial and consequently V is not
diffeomorphic to the 3-sphere even though it has the same homology as the 3-sphere.
(It is in fact easy to see that the fundamental group of V is the binary icosahedral
group, which is the pre-image of Γ
60
in the double covering SU (2)
→ SO(3).) This
example is called the Poincar´
e homology sphere.
Having constructed this example, Poincar´
e asks the natural follow-up question,
What if the fundamental group is trivial? Is that enough to force the manifold to
be diffeomorphic to the 3-sphere?
Actually, Poincar´
e asks this question and then goes on to say, “In other words,
if V is simply connected can we change the families of curves generating the two
handlebodies until they meet in the standard way (so that for each i, K
i
meets only
K
i
and meets it only once)?” Arranging this will certainly prove that the manifold
V is diffeomorphic to S
3
, but the converse is not obvious and was not established
until the 1960s by Waldhausen [50].

100 YEARS OF TOPOLOGY
19
To prepare the way for the higher dimensional analogues of the Poincar´
e Con-
jecture, let us reformulate it. Suppose that V has trivial fundamental group. Since
the first homology of V is the abelianization of the fundamental group, V has trivial
first Betti number and no torsion coefficients for the first homology. By Poincar´
e
duality this implies that the second Betti number is trivial. Consequently, V au-
tomatically has the homology of S
3
. In fact, as we know now, a much stronger
statement is true: the manifold is homotopy equivalent to the sphere in the sense
that there are maps from the manifold to S
3
and from S
3
to the manifold so that
each composition is homotopic to the identity of the appropriate manifold. Such
manifolds are called homotopy 3-spheres.
2.8. Why the Poincar´
e Conjecture has been so tantalizing. Poincar´
e’s
approach makes clear one reason that his conjecture is so tantalizing. It can be
reformulated purely in terms of curves on a surface. One begins with two families
F and F of p disjoint simple curves on a surface of genus p, each family standard
in its own right up to self-diffeomorphism of the surface. One is allowed to replace
say
F by another family normally generating the same subgroup as F . Can one
find such a replacement with the property that the resulting two families are dual
in the sense that the i
th
curve from
F meets only the i
th
curve from
F and meets
that curve in a single point, if and only if the quotient of the fundamental group
of the surface by the normal subgroup generated by the collection of curves in
F ∪ F is the trivial group? One feels that this is a problem one can attack without
any sophisticated theory; surely one can understand curves on a surface and their
intersection patterns well enough to decide the question.
There is a purely group theoretic reformulation of the question: Suppose we
have a surface Σ of genus p
≥ 2 and a homomorphism ϕ from the fundamental
group of Σ onto F
p
× F
p
where F
p
is the free group on p generators. Then ϕ factors
through a surjection onto a non-trivial free product A
∗ B. This purely group-
theoretic question also seems tantalizingly approachable, but no one has succeeded
in giving a direct, group theoretic, proof.
3. Work during the period 1904–1950
3.1. Dehn’s work. The next major attack on the topology of 3-manifolds
came from Max Dehn. In 1910 he published a paper [8] where he showed that taking
two non-trivial knot complements (the complements of a solid-torus neighborhoods
of two non-trivial knots in the 3-sphere) and sewing them together so that the
meridian of one matches the longitude of the other and vice-versa produces a 3-
manifold with the homology of S
3
. Dehn also claimed that these manifolds were
not diffeomorphic to S
3
since they contain a torus that does not bound a solid
torus. But it was not until 1924 that Alexander ([2]) established that every torus
in the 3-sphere bounds a solid torus. On the other hand, it is not too difficult
to see (using Van Kampen’s theorem which was formulated later but more or less
understood even in Poincar´
e’s day) that the fundamental groups of the manifolds
that Dehn constructed in this way are non-trivial, so that these manifolds are indeed
distinct from S
3
. This produces a plethora of homology 3-spheres (manifolds with
the homology of the 3-sphere). Dehn also introduced a notion that has proven
to be of central importance in the theory of 3-manifolds; namely, the notion of
Dehn surgery. Given a 3-manifold M and a knot K
⊂ M, one removes a solid
torus neighborhood of K from M and sews this solid torus back into the resulting

20
JOHN W. MORGAN
complement using some self-diffeomorphism of the boundary 2-torus. These self-
diffeomorphsims up to isotopy are identified with SL(2,
Z) via the action of the
diffeomorphism on the first homology of the two-torus. Dehn then constructed
manifolds by this method, starting with a (2, q)-torus knot in S
3
—these are knots
lying on the surface of a standard torus and wrapping that torus linearly twice in
one direction and q times in the other (q must be odd). Dehn identified which of the
non-identity Dehn surgeries on (2, q)-torus knots produce manifolds with with the
homology of the 3-sphere and showed that they all have non-trivial fundamental
groups (usually infinite). When the knot is the (2, 3)-torus knot there is a surgery
that produces a manifold with the same group as Poincar´
e’s example (later proved
to be diffeomorphic to Poincar´
e’s example).
The examples of Dehn surgery on (2, q)-torus knots were much better under-
stood after the work of Seifert [42] and Seifert and Threlfall [43]. They considered
3-manifolds that admit locally free circle actions (now called Seifert fibrations).
They showed that all of the examples coming from Dehn surgery on (2, q)-torus
knots were such manifolds and they showed how to compute the fundamental group
of these manifolds. In particular, Dehn’s exceptional example was shown to have
the same fundamental group as Poincar´
e’s original example—it is the pre-image in
SU (2) of the symmetries of the regular icosahedron (Dehn had earlier considered
this fundamental group but slightly miscomputed it.)
3.2. Work of Kneser. In [24] Kneser had also constructed a 3-manifold with
the same fundamental group as Poincar´
e’s example (and Dehn’s exceptional exam-
ple). He described the manifold as the space of regular icosahedra of volume 1
centered at the origin in
R
3
; or said another way the quotient SO(3)/Γ
60
, where
recall that Γ
60
is the group of symmetries of a regular icosahedron centered at
the origin in 3-space. This description implies that this manifold has a spherical
geometry: it is the quotient of the 3-sphere with its standard metric by a finite
group of isometries acting freely. Thus, the quotient has a Riemannian metric
of constant sectional curvature +1. Later it was shown that all these manifolds—
Poincar´
e’s original example, Dehn’s example and the geometric quotient introduced
by Kneser are diffeomorphic. It is now known, thanks to the work of Perelman,
that this is the only homology 3-sphere (besides S
3
) with finite fundamental group.
Kneser made another, even more important contribution to the study of the
topology of 3-manifolds. He studied essential families of disjointly embedded 2-
spheres in compact 3-manifolds. Essential means that each member is non-trivial
in the sense that it does not bound a 3-ball and no two members of the family
are parallel in the sense that they form the boundary of a region diffeomorphic to
S
2
× I in the 3-manifold. He showed that for every compact 3-manifold V there
is a finite upper bound to the number of two spheres in any essential family. This
leads us to three definitions:
Definition
3.1.
(1) A 3-manifold is prime if it is not diffeomorphic to S
3
and if every sepa-
rating 2-sphere in the manifold bounds a 3-ball.
(2) A 3-manifold is irreducible if every 2-sphere in the 3-manifold bounds a
3-ball.
(3) A 3-manifold V is a connected sum of X and Y , with X and Y being the
summands, if there is a separating 2-sphere in V such that the two sides
of this sphere are diffeomorphic to X
\ B
3
and Y
\ B
3
. The connected

100 YEARS OF TOPOLOGY
21
sum is non-trivial unless one of the two summands is diffeomorphic to S
3
.
In that case V is diffeomorphic to the other summand.
It is easy to see that the only (orientable) prime 3-manifold that is not irre-
ducible is S
2
× S
1
. It is also easy to see that a 3-manifold is a non-trivial con-
nected sum unless it is prime or diffeomorphic to S
3
. The import in these terms
of Kneser’s result is that every compact 3-manifold is a connected sum of (finitely
many) prime 3-manifolds. Such a decomposition is called a prime decomposition
of the 3-manifold, and the prime manifolds that appear are the prime factors of
the decomposition. Later, Milnor ([27]) showed that the prime factors that ap-
pear in any prime decomposition of a given 3-manifold are the same (up to order)
no matter what prime decomposition is chosen. Thus, from a structural point of
view 3-manifolds up to diffeomorphism are just like the natural numbers: there is
a commutative product—connected sum—with a unit—S
3
—and an infinite collec-
tion of primes. Every 3-manifold is a product (i.e., a connected sum) of a finite
number of prime factors and the prime factors are unique up to order. This result
reduces all questions about 3-manifolds to questions about prime 3-manifolds. For
example, because the fundamental group of a connected sum of 3-manifolds is the
free product of the fundamental groups of the factors, there is a counter-example
to Poincar´
e’s Conjecture if and only if there is a prime counter-example. Indeed,
the set of homotopy 3-spheres (up to diffeomorphism) is the free monoid on the
prime homotopy 3-spheres. Of course, we now know, thanks to Perelman, that this
monoid has only one element, namely S
3
. The unique connected sum decomposition
result does not hold in dimensions greater than 3.
4. Work from 1950–1970
4.1. Work of Papakyriakopoulos. The next advances in the topology of
3-manifolds occurred in the 1950s and were due to Christos Papakyriakopoulos
(universally known as Papa). He showed ([32]) two remarkable and very important
results about surfaces in 3-manifolds. The first goes under the name of Dehn’s
Lemma and the Loop Theorem. It says that if M is a compact 3-manifold with
boundary and if Σ is a boundary component of M with the property that the map
on the fundamental groups induced by inclusion of Σ into M has a non-trivial kernel
then (i) there is a simple closed curve in Σ that is not homotopically trivial in Σ but
is homotopically trivial in M , and (ii) given any simple closed curve homotopically
non-trivial in Σ but homotopically trivial in M , this curve is the boundary of a disk
embedded into M . The second of Papa’s results is called the Sphere Theorem. It
says that if M has non-trivial second homotopy then there is either an embedded
2-sphere in M or an embedded projective plane in M so that the map induced by
the inclusion of this surface into M is non-trivial on the second homotopy group.
Let us point out some consequences of Dehn’s Lemma and the Loop Theorem.
The first verifies a claim of Dehn’s from 1910:
Corollary
4.1. Any embedded 2-torus in S
3
bounds a solid torus.
Proof.
Let T
⊂ S
3
be an embedded 2-torus. The first remark is that by the
uniqueness of the prime decomposition, any 2-sphere in S
3
bounds a 3-ball on each
side. The surface T separates the 3-sphere. According to van Kampen’s theorem
the fundamental group of T cannot inject into the fundamental group of both sides
since the fundamental group of the 3-sphere is trivial. Thus, by Dehn’s Lemma and

22
JOHN W. MORGAN
the Loop Theorem there is an embedded disk in the 3-sphere meeting T exactly in
its boundary and this simple closed curve is homotopically non-trivial on T . The
union N of a thickening of T and a neighborhood of the disk has two boundary
components: a 2-torus parallel to T and a 2-sphere. The 2-sphere bounds a 3-ball
whose interior is disjoint from N , and the union of N and this 3-ball is a solid torus
whose boundary is a 2-torus parallel to T . Hence, T also bounds a solid torus.
Another consequence is an analogue of the Poincar´
e Conjecture for knots.
Corollary
4.2. A knot K
⊂ S
3
is the trivial knot (i.e., deforms as a knot
in S
3
to a planar circle) if and only if the fundamental group of the complement
S
3
\ K is isomorphic to Z.
Proof.
First notice that the trivial knot has complement that is an open
solid torus so the fundamental group of its complement is indeed isomorphic to
Z.
Conversely, suppose that the fundamental group of the complement is isomorphic
to
Z. Let ν be a solid torus neighborhood of K and let T be its boundary. Then the
fundamental group of (S
3
\ int ν) is also isomorphic to Z. Hence, by Dehn’s lemma
and the Loop Theorem there is an embedded disk in S
3
\ int ν whose boundary is
a homotopically non-trivial simple closed curve on T . As before, this means that
S
3
\ int ν is a solid torus. From this it is easy to see that K bounds a, smoothly
embedded disk in S
3
, meaning that K continuously deforms as a knot to a planar
circle.
I believe that the feeling was that when Papa proved these results the Poincar´
e
Conjecture and the complete classification of 3-manifolds would not be far behind.
While Papa’s results spurred tremendous progress in the subject, this was not to be
the case in spite of a plethora of claimed proofs of the Poincar´
e Conjecture around
this time.
4.2. Haken and Waldhausen. The work of Papa led in the 1960s to a
much deeper understanding of 3-dimensional manifolds. Haken ([16]) generalized
Kneser’s argument for 2-spheres in a 3-manifold to surfaces of higher genus whose
fundamental groups inject. He showed that in any given compact irreducible 3-
manifold the number of non-parallel such surfaces is bounded. He also introduced
hierarchies for compact, irreducible 3-manifolds admitting at least one embedded
surface of genus
≥ 1 whose fundamental group injects into the manifold. In [51]
Waldhausen used these ideas to study such manifolds, which he called sufficiently
large. He was able to show the analogue of the Poincar´
e Conjecture: Two suffi-
ciently large 3-manifolds with isomorphic fundamental groups are diffeomorphic. (It
had been known since the work of Alexander, [1], in 1919 that there are lens spaces,
which are quotients of S
3
by cyclic groups, with isomorphic fundamental groups
that are not homeomorphic.) Thus, the theory of sufficiently large 3-manifolds was
well understood by 1968. Of course, the sphere and any homotopy sphere are not
sufficiently large, so the theory of sufficiently large 3-manifolds is orthogonal to the
Poincar´
e Conjecture. What was then coming into focus is that the ‘small’ three
manifolds, e.g., those with finite fundamental group are much harder to study than
the sufficiently large ones.

100 YEARS OF TOPOLOGY
23
5. Passage to Higher Dimensions
While the work on 3-manifolds was continuing, a broadening of perspective
was taking place in topology. During the last half of the 1950s and then with
a vengeance after Smale’s work in 1961, attention of the topologist largely shifted
from dimension 3 to higher dimensions, i.e., dimensions
≥ 5. Milnor ([26]) produced
exotic smooth structures on the spheres starting in dimension 7. This was a surprise.
It brought into focus something that had never been explicitly considered before:
There were different categories of manifolds and classification results depend on
the category. The three categories one considers are smooth (i.e., differentiable),
piecewise linear (triangulated so that the link of every simplex is combinatorially
equivalent to a standard triangulation of a sphere of the appropriate dimension and
denoted pl) and topological. The issues had not arisen for Poincar´
e since, as we
now know, every topological manifold of dimension
≤ 3 has a pl structure and a
smooth structure, these refined structures being unique up to pl isomorphism and
diffeomorphism, respectively. More precisely, the three categories of manifolds are
equivalent in dimensions
≤ 3. It also follows from elementary arguments that every
piecewise linear 4-manifold has a smooth structure unique up to diffeomorphism,
i.e., that the pl category and the smooth category are equivalent in dimension 4.
In the differentiable category one might imagine, C
1
, C
2
, ...C

and real ana-
lytic manifolds but these categories are all equivalent, so one usually works with C

manifolds. As Poincar´
e had already discovered in the first complement to Analysis
Situs any smooth manifold has a smooth triangulation and hence carries a piecewise
linear structure. Of course, any smooth manifold, where the overlaps between the
coordinate charts are required to be smooth, is a fortiori a topological manifold,
where the overlaps between the coordinate charts are required simply to be continu-
ous. In a similar way any piecewise linear manifold is a topological manifold. What
Milnor’s examples showed is that the topological (and even piecewise linear) struc-
ture on the 7-sphere supports at least 7 different (i.e., non-diffeomorphic) smooth
structures. In particular, this shows that the smooth version of the Poincar´
e Con-
jecture is not true in dimension 7. Not too long after that Kervaire ([20]) showed
that there is a piecewise linear manifold of dimension 10 that admits no smooth
structure. Later, manifolds with Lipschitz structures were introduced (see [46])
and it was shown that, except in dimension 4, every topological manifold has a
unique Lipschitz structure up to bi-Lipschitz homeomorphism. In this category
of manifolds some forms of analysis are possible that are not feasible with only a
topological structure.
These results left open the question for the topological and piecewise linear
versions of the analogue of the Poincar´
e Conjecture in dimensions
≥ 5. In 1961
Smale ([44]) showed, by using Morse theory in a way that can be viewed as a
generalization of Poincar´
e’s approach to the question in dimension 3, that a smooth
manifold of dimension at least 5 that has trivial fundamental group and has the
homology of the sphere is homeomorphic to the sphere. Shortly thereafter, John
Stallings ([45]) showed that a piecewise linear manifold of dimension at least 7 that
has trivial fundamental group and has the homology of the sphere has the property
that after removing a point it becomes piecewise linearly equivalent to Euclidean
space. Later, ([7], [29]) it was shown that topological manifolds of these dimensions
with trivial fundamental group and the homology of the sphere are homeomorphic
to the sphere.

24
JOHN W. MORGAN
Smale’s method of proof established a much more general result, called the
h-cobordism theorem. It says that any compact manifold with two boundary com-
ponents (W, ∂

W, ∂
+
W ) that is homotopy equivalent as a triple to (N
× I, N ×
{0}, N × {1}) where N is a simply connected manifold of dimension at least 5 is
in fact diffeomorphic to N
× I. This theorem, together with cobordism theory in-
troduced by Ren´
e Thom ([48]) in the 1950s and 1960s and the related theory of
characteristic classes, led to the Browder-Novikov surgery theory ([4]) which gives
a highly successful way of describing simply connected manifolds of dimension
≥ 5.
At about the same time the relationship between the various categories of man-
ifolds, at least in dimensions
≥ 5, was clarified. Kervaire and Milnor ([21]) gave
a classification up to diffeomorphism of differentiable structures on the topolog-
ical sphere or piecewise linear sphere. These form a finite abelian group under
connected sum whose structure is reduced to number theoretic questions. These
groups explain the difference between the piecewise linear theory and the smooth
theory. As to topological manifolds, in 1969 Kirby and Siebenmann ([23]), showed
that except for one minor twist related ironically enough to Poincar´
e’s homology
sphere, the classification of topological and piecewise linear manifolds of dimensions
≥ 5 coincide.
Thus, by 1970 the theory of manifolds of dimensions
≥ 5 was well under-
stood but the questions about the ‘low dimensions’—3 and 4—including the origi-
nal Poincar´
e Conjecture remained a mystery. I think it is fair to say that all these
results used the sort of purely topological, including differential topological and
combinatorial topological, arguments along the lines that Poincar´
e foreshadowed
and developed in l’Analysis Situs and its complements. But as the attention re-
turned to the lower dimensions there was only one more result to come from the
purely topological techniques. This was Michael Freedman’s proof [12]) of the topo-
logical version of the h-cobordism theorem and Poincar´
e Conjecture in dimension
4. His technique was to find a way to extend Smale’s argument to 4-dimensional
manifolds. Although I have just characterized this as a purely topological argu-
ment, as it is, it falls outside the type of things that Poincar´
e considered. Poincar´
e
used smooth and piecewise smooth techniques whereas Freedman’s technique is
purely topological, the surfaces he constructs in the course of his argument are
topologically quite intricate and they cannot be made smooth or piecewise smooth.
Indeed at the same time Freedman was establishing the topological version of
the h-cobordism theorem for 4 manifolds, Donaldson, in [9] using more geomet-
ric and analytic techniques inspired by physics (see below) was showing that the
h-cobordism theorem does not extend to smooth 4-manifolds. This led quickly
to examples of topological 4-manifolds, indeed smooth complex algebraic surfaces,
with infinitely many non-diffeomorphic smooth structures—something that hap-
pens only in dimension 4. For every n = 4 Euclidean space
R
n
has a unique
smooth structure up to diffeomorphism; there are uncountably many differentiable
distinct smooth structures on
R
4
.
5.1. Connections, characteristic classes, and cobordism theory. The
advances in the understanding of high dimensional manifolds relied on other devel-
opments in topology and geometry. These involved looking not directly at manifolds
but rather at auxiliary objects over manifolds. The most important auxiliary ob-
jects are principal bundles and associated fiber bundles and vector bundles. Of
course, the frame bundle of the tangent bundle of the manifold is an example of a

100 YEARS OF TOPOLOGY
25
principal bundle and the tangent bundle itself is an associated vector bundle. These
are important examples but not the only ones. Other bundles not directly derived
from the manifold were also considered. These bundles can be equipped with an
important geometric object, a connection. Connections have curvature and through
the resulting Chern-Weil theory ([6]) curvature gives rise to characteristic classes,
which can also be defined purely topologically, for example from the cohomology
of appropriate classifying spaces. The relationship between geometry and topology
in this theory is made clear by the Atiyah-Singer index theorem, [3] which relates
the index of elliptic operators between sections of vector bundles in terms of the
symbol of the operator and characteristic classes on the manifold.
These ideas are intricately woven into the study of high dimensional manifolds
in many ways. Milnor’s original examples of exotic smooth structures on S
7
were
described as fiber bundles with fiber S
3
over S
4
associated to a principal SO(4)-
bundle, and his argument used the classification of these bundles. The classification
of the group of exotic structures on high dimensional spheres by Kervaire-Milnor
relied in an essential way on Thom’s cobordism theory ([48]) and the Hirzebruch
index theorem ([17]) (a special case of the Aityah-Singer index theorem that was
proved earlier) relating a topological invariant of a smooth manifold (its signature,
or index which is computed from the intersection pairing on the middle dimensional
homology) to a characteristic number computed using the Pontrjagin characteris-
tic classes of the manifold. These ideas play an even more important role in the
Browder-Novikov surgery theory ([4]) for understanding all high dimensional man-
ifolds.
6. Geometry and physics and low dimensional topology
In the late 1970s and through the 1980s the focus of topology shifted back to
the low dimensional manifolds—those of dimensions 3 and 4. The techniques were
no longer purely topological—ideas and results from geometry and physics began
to play a role.
6.1. Physics and 4-manifolds. In one of the great convergences of ideas from
different fields, it turns out that Yang and Mills, [55], were trying to understand a
physical theory analogous to electro-magnetism (EM) where the fields transformed
under SU (2) (instead of U (1) for EM). They were led to write down a Lagrangian
in terms of a connection on the principal SU (2)-bundle and matter fields in the
associated two-dimensional complex vector bundle. The term involving only the
connection that appears in the Lagrangian is the usual term computed from the
partial derivatives of the connection, the same term that one finds in EM, together
with a quadratic expression from the connection. What they had arrived at with the
sum of these two terms is exactly the mathematical definition of the curvature of a
connection. The term that appears in the Lagrangian related only to the connection
is exactly the norm square of the curvature of the connection. (There are other
terms involving the connection and the matter fields.)
The classical equations
of motion are the first order Euler-Lagrange equations for a critical point of the
resulting action functional, called the Yang-Mills action. Thus, physically-inspired
reasoning had led Yang and Mills to develop a crucially important physical theory
that used the mathematics from some 40 years earlier.
The resulting physical
theories are called gauge theories and they have turned out to be central in all
modern developments of high energy theoretical physics. For example, the standard

26
JOHN W. MORGAN
model of high energy theoretical physics is written in terms of gauge theories for
various gauge groups (U (1) for EM, SU (2) for the weak force, and SU (3) for the
strong force for QCD, the theory governing quarks and gluons).
The greatest
triumph of the gauge theories is in their accurate description of the interactions
of the elementary particles and in particular the peculiar energy dependence of
non-abelian gauge theories by Gross and Wilzcek ([15]) and Politzer ([40]) which
implies asymptotic freedom for QCD.
In the study of 4-dimensional manifolds the impact of ideas from physics were
being felt. Donaldson showed how to use the moduli space of solutions of the anti-
self-dual equations for connections on an auxiliary principal SU (2)-bundle over
a 4-manifold, equipped with a Riemannian metric, to produce non-classical (i.e.,
non-homotopy theoretic) invariants of 4-manifolds. By definition an anti-self-dual
connection on a principal bundle over a 4-manifold is a connection whose curvature
form is anti-self-dual. These connections are the minima for the pure Yang-Mills
action functional, pure in the sense that there are no matter fields. Hence, anti-
self-dual connections are special cases of Yang-Mills connections, which, recall, are
critical points of the action functional. Later, Seiberg and Witten [41] constructed
other invariants from a different physical theory, a gauge theory with structure
group U (1) and matter fields. By physics arguments Witten ([53]) established
the relationship of these invariants to the invariants constructed by Donaldson.
While this relationship has not been proven mathematically, the evidence for it is
overwhelming and surely it is just a matter of time until this result is mathematically
established. Since the Seiberg-Witten invariants are technically much easier to work
with than Donaldson’s original invariants, they have replaced them as the primary
means of constructing 4-manifold invariants. These invariants were used to show
that many naturally occurring 4-manifolds were not diffeomorphic, [9, 13, 28].
While they are not complete invariants, they do show that the classification of
simply connected 4-manifolds is quite complicated. For example, it seems likely
that there is an injective map from isotopy classes of knots in S
3
to diffeomorphism
classes of 4-manifolds homeomorphic to a smooth hypersurface in
CP
3
of degree 4 (a
K3 surface), see [10]. Unlike the situation with 3-manifolds where there was a clear
guess as to the nature of the theory, the theory of smooth 4-manifolds is completely
unknown and we have no good guesses as to the structure of this theory. This is the
remaining mystery in the program that Poincar´
e outlined over one hundred years
ago of understanding manifolds in terms of their algebraic invariants.
6.2. Geometrization of 3-manifolds. Thurston ([49]) introduced the idea
of equipping (many) 3-manifolds with hyperbolic structures—these structures come
from the Kleinian groups which Poincar´
e introduced and are the 3-dimensional
analogue of surfaces that are the quotient of the Poincar´
e disk by fuchsian groups.
Thurston was able to construct hyperbolic structures on prime 3-manifolds whose
fundamental groups satisfy the obvious necessary conditions, provided that the 3-
manifolds are sufficiently large. He also produced other examples of hyperbolic
structures on non-sufficiently large 3-manifolds. The latter he produced by doing
Dehn surgeries on other hyperbolic manifolds. This led him to conjecture that
the obvious necessary fundamental group conditions are sufficient for a prime 3-
manifold to admit a hyperbolic structure. Pursuing this line further, he asked
himself what might be true for the other prime 3-manifolds. Pondering this led
him to formulate the Geometrization Conjecture, which says roughly that every

100 YEARS OF TOPOLOGY
27
prime 3-manifold can be cut open along incompressible tori into pieces that ad-
mit complete homogeneous geometries of finite volume. A direct and immediate
consequence of this conjecture is the Poincar´
e Conjecture. There are eight possi-
bilities for the type of geometry with the most plentiful and the most interesting
being hyperbolic geometry. This conjecture, which is what Perelman established,
is explained in more detail by both McMullen and Thurston in their presentations
at this conference. This reduces the problem of classifying closed 3-manifolds to
the problem of classifying discrete, torsion-free subgroups of SL(2,
C) of finite co-
volume up to conjugacy. It gives a completely satisfying conceptual picture of the
nature of all 3-manifolds, and it shows how closely related these topological objects
are to homogeneous geometric ones. All closed 3-manifolds are made from homo-
geneous geometric ones by two simple operations—gluing along incompressible tori
and connected sum. As a sidelight, this resolves in the affirmative the Poincar´
e
Conjecture.
6.3. Invariants of 3-manifolds. There has been much other work in 3-
manifold topology independent of the Geometrization Conjecture. This began with
the Jones polynomial invariant for knots in S
3
([18]), which was generalized by
Witten ([52]) using a physical theory to invariants of all 3-manifolds. There are
combinatorial definitions of the Jones polynomial, basically skein relations that say
how the invariant is related before and after changing a crossing on the knot and
doing surgery at the crossing. These types of relations led to other combinato-
rial notions of knot invariants and sometimes to 3-manifold invariants. One of the
most powerful seems to be the Khovanov homology of knots in S
3
([22]). These
homology groups should be viewed as a categorification of, i.e., enrichment of, the
Jones polynomial. Like the original Jones polynomial, these invariants are defined
starting with a braid presentation of the knot. There is now a proposal due to
Witten ([54]), coming from physics, for how to extend Khovanov theory for knots
to give 3-manifold invariants but no mathematical treatment yet exists.
From a more geometric prospective, one can define 3-dimensional invariants
using the anti-self-dual equations and the Seiberg-Witten equations. The idea,
which essentially goes back to Floer ([11]), is to consider finite energy solutions
to these equations on the 4-manifold obtained by crossing the given 3-manifold
with
R. This leads to invariants of 3-manifolds called Donaldson-Floer invariants
and Seiberg-Witten Floer invariants. There is a related set of invariants coming
from Floer’s original definition of Floer homology in the symplectic context. These
are due to Ozsva´th-Szabo´, [30]. They defined an invariant called Heegaard-Floer
homology. It is believed to be equivalent to the Seiberg-Witten Floer homology (see
[25]) and hence closely related to the Donaldson-Floer homology, and on the other
hand it has a purely combinatorial definition, [31]. It brings us full circle because
it is defined from the intersection pattern of the two families of simple closed curves
on the splitting surface of a Heegaard decomposition of the 3-manifold.
How all of these invariants of a 3-manifold, inspired by combinatorics and
physics, are related to the geometric decomposition of the 3-manifold is another
tantalizing mystery. An understanding of that could conceivably lead to a purely
topological proof of the Poincar´
e Conjecture since one would understand the rela-
tionship of invariants made from the intersection pattern of curves on a Heegaard
surface to the geometric decomposition of the manifold. This would complete the
3-dimensional program in the manner that Poincar´
e laid it out.

28
JOHN W. MORGAN
References
1. J. Alexander. Note on two 3-dimensional manifolds with the same group. Trans. Amer. Math.
Soc., 20:339–342, 1919. MR1501131
2. J. Alexander. On the subdivision of 3-space by a polyhedron. Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences, 10:6–8, 1924.
3. M. Atiyah and I. Singer. The index of elliptic operators. I. Ann. of Math. (2), 87:484–530,
1968. MR0236950 (38:5243)
4. W. Browder. Surgery on simply-connected manifolds. Springer-Verlag, New York, 1972. Ergeb-
nisse der Mathematik und ihrer Grenzgebiete, Band 65. MR0358813 (50:11272)
5. E. Cartan. Les Systemes Differentiels Exterieurs et leurs Applications Geometriques. Her-
mann, 1945.
6. S-S. Chern. On the characteristic ring of a differentiable manifold. Acad. Sinica Science Record,
2:1–5, 1947. MR0023053 (9:297i)
7. E. Connell. A topological H-cobordism theorem for n
≥ 5. Illinois J. Math., 11:300–309, 1967.
MR0212808 (35:3673)
8. M Dehn. Uber die topologie des dreidimensionalen Raumes. Math. Ann., 69:137 – 168, 1910.
MR1511580
9. S. Donaldson. Irrationality and the h-cobordism conjecture. J. Differential Geom., 26(1):141–
168, 1987. MR892034 (88j:57035)
10. R. Fintushel and R. Stern. Knots, links, and 4-manifolds. Invent. Math., 134(2):363–400, 1998.
MR1650308 (99j:57033)
11. A. Floer. An instanton-invariant for 3-manifolds. Comm. Math. Phys., 118(2):215–240, 1988.
MR956166 (89k:57028)
12. M. Freedman. The topology of four-dimensional manifolds. J. Differential Geom., 17(3):357–
453, 1982. MR679066 (84b:57006)
13. R. Friedman and J. Morgan. Algebraic surfaces and Seiberg-Witten invariants. J. Algebraic
Geom., 6(3):445–479, 1997. MR1487223 (99b:32045)
14. C. McA. Gordon. 3-dimensional Topology up to 1960. In History of Topology, pages 449 –
489. Elsevier Science B. V., 1999. MR1674921 (2000h:57003)
15. D. Gross and F. Wilzcek. Ultraviolet behavior of nonabelian gauge theories. Phys.Rev.Lett.,
30:1343–1346, 1973.
16. W. Haken. Theorie der Normalfl¨
achen. Acta Math., 105:245 – 375, 1961.
MR0141106
(25:4519a)
17. F. Hirzebruch. Neue topologische Methoden in der algebraischen Geometrie. pages viii+165,
1956. MR0082174 (18:509b)
18. V. Jones. A polynomial invariant for knots via von Neumann algebras. Bull. Amer. Math.
Soc. (N.S.), 12(1):103–111, 1985. MR766964 (86e:57006)
19. V. Katz. A history of Stokes’ Theorem. Mathematics Magazine, 52:146–156, 1979. MR533433
(80j:01018)
20. M. Kervaire. A manifold which does not admit any differentiable structure. Comment. Math.
Helv., 34:257–270, 1960. MR0139172 (25:2608)
21. M. Kervaire and J.. Milnor. Groups of homotopy spheres. I. Ann. of Math. (2), 77:504–537,
1963. MR0148075 (26:5584)
22. M. Khovanov. A categorification of the Jones polynomial. Duke Math. J., 101(3):359–426,
2000. MR1740682 (2002j:57025)
23. R. Kirby and L. Siebenmann. Foundational essays on topological manifolds, smoothings, and
triangulations. Princeton University Press, Princeton, N.J., 1977. With notes by John Milnor
and Michael Atiyah, Annals of Mathematics Studies, No. 88.
24. H. Kneser. Geschlossene fl¨
achen in dreidimensionale Mannifgaltigkeiten. Nachr. Ges. Wiss.

ottingen, pages 128 – 130, 1929.
25. C. Kutluhan, Y-J. Lee, and C. Taubes. HF=HM I: Heegaard Floer homology and Seiberg–
Witten Floer homology. ArXiv.MathGT:1007.1979.
26. J. Milnor. On manifolds homeomorphic to the 7-sphere. Ann. of Math. (2), 64:399–405, 1956.
MR0082103 (18:498d)
27. J. Milnor. A unique factorization theorem for 3-manifolds. Amer. J. Math., 84:1 – 7, 1962.
MR0142125 (25:5518)

100 YEARS OF TOPOLOGY
29
28. J. Morgan and T. Mrowka. On the diffeomorphism classification of regular elliptic surfaces.
Internat. Math. Res. Notices, (6):183–184, 1993. MR1224116 (94g:57035)
29. M. H. A. Newman. The engulfing theorem for topological manifolds. Ann. of Math. (2),
84:555–571, 1966. MR0203708 (34:3557)
30. P. Ozsv´
ath and Z. Szab´
o. Holomorphic disks and topological invariants for closed three-
manifolds. Ann. of Math. (2), 159(3):1027–1158, 2004. MR2113019 (2006b:57016)
31. P. Ozsv´
ath, Z. Szab´
o, and D. Thurston. Legendrian knots, transverse knots and combinatorial
Floer homology. Geom. Topol., 12(2):941–980, 2008. MR2403802 (2009f:57051)
32. C. Papakyriakopoulos. On Dehn’s lemma and the asphericity of knots. Ann. of Math., 66:1
–26, 1957. MR0090053 (19:761a)
33. H. Poincar´
e. Sur l’analysis situs. Comptes rendus de l’Acad´
emie des Science, 115:633 –636,
1892.
34. H. Poincar´
e. Analysis Situs. Journal de l’Ecole Polytechnique, 1:1 –121, 1895.
35. H. Poincar´
e. Compl´
ement a l’analysis situs. Rendiconti del Circolo Matematico di Palermo,
13:285 –343, 1899.
36. H. Poincar´
e. Second compl´
ement a l’analysis situs. Proceedings of the London Mathematical
Society, 32:277 – 308, 1900.
37. H. Poincar´
e. Certaines surfaces algr´
ebriques; troisi`
eme compl´
ement a l’analysis situs. Bulletin
de la Societ´
e Math´
ematique de France, 30:49 – 70, 1902. MR1504408
38. H. Poincar´
e. Les cycles des surfaces alg´
ebriques; quatri`
eme compl´
ement a l’analysis situs.
Journal de Math´
ematiques, 8:169 – 214, 1902.
39. H. Poincar´
e. Cinqui`
eme compl´
ement a l’analysis situs. Rendiconti del Circolo matematico di
Palermo, 18:45 –110, 1905.
40. H. Politzer. Reliable perturbative results for strong interactions? Phys.Rev.Lett., 30:1346–
1349, 1973.
41. N. Seiberg and E. Witten. Electric-magnetic duality, monopole condensation, and confine-
ment in N = 2 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. Nuclear Phys. B, 426(1):19–52, 1994.
MR1293681 (95m:81202a)
42. H. Seifert. Topologie dreidimensionaler gefaserter R¨
aume. Acta math., 60:147 – 238, 1932.
43. H. Seifert and W. Threlfall. A Textbook of Topology. Academic Press, 1980.
MR575168
(82b:55001)
44. S. Smale. Generalized Poincar´
e’s conjecture in dimensions greater than four. Ann. of Math.
(2), 74:391–406, 1961. MR0137124 (25:580)
45. J. Stallings. The piecewise-linear structure of Euclidean space. Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc.,
58:481–488, 1962. MR0149457 (26:6945)
46. D. Sullivan. Hyperbolic geometry and homeomorphisms. In Geometric topology: Proceedings
of the 1977 Georgia Topology Conference held in Athens, Georgia, August 1-12, 1977, pages
543 – 555. Academic Press, 1979. MR537749 (81m:57012)
47. R. Thom. Sous-vari´
et´
es et classes d’homologie des vari´
et´
es diff´
erentiables. I. Le th´
eor`
eme

en´
eral. C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, 236:453–454, 1953. MR0054961 (14:1005a)
48. R. Thom. Vari´
et´
es diff´
erentiables cobordantes. C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, 236:1733–1735, 1953.
MR0055689 (14:1112b)
49. W. Thurston. Three-dimensional manifolds, Kleinian groups and hyperbolic geometry. Bull.
Amer. Math. Soc. (N.S.), 6(3):357–381, 1982. MR648524 (83h:57019)
50. F. Waldhausen. Heegaard-Zerlegungen der 3-Sph¨
are. Topology, 7:195–203, 1968. MR0227992
(37:3576)
51. F. Waldhausen. On irreducible 3-manifolds which are sufficiently large. Ann. of Math, 87:56
– 88, 1968. MR0224099 (36:7146)
52. E. Witten. Quantum field theory and the Jones polynomial. Comm. Math. Phys., 121(3):351–
399, 1989. MR990772 (90h:57009)
53. E. Witten. Monopoles and four-manifolds. Math. Res. Lett., 1(6):769–796, 1994. MR1306021
(96d:57035)
54. E. Witten. Fivebranes and knots, 2011. preprint, arXiv:1101.3216 [hep-th]. MR2852941
55. C. N. Yang and F. Mills. Conservation of isotopic spin and isotopic gauge invariance. Phys.
Rev., 96:191 –195, 1954. MR0065437 (16:432j)
Stony Brook University

Clay Mathematics Proceedings
Volume 19, 2014
The Evolution of Geometric Structures on 3-Manifolds
Curtis T. McMullen
Abstract.
This paper gives an overview of the geometrization conjecture and
approaches to its proof.
1. Introduction
In 1300, Dante described a universe in which the concentric terraces of hell—
nesting down to the center of the earth—are mirrored by concentric celestial spheres,
rising and converging to a single luminous point.
Topologically, this finite yet
unbounded space would today be described as a three-dimensional sphere.
In 1904, Poincar´
e asked if the 3-sphere is the only closed 3-manifold in which
every loop can be shrunk to a point; a positive answer became known as the Poincar´
e
conjecture. Although the theory of manifolds developed rapidly in the following
generations, this conjecture remained open.
In the 1980’s, Thurston showed that a large class of 3-manifolds are hyperbolic—
they admit rigid metrics of constant negative curvature. At the same time he
proposed a geometric description of all 3-dimensional manifolds, subsuming the
Poincar´
e conjecture as a special case.
Both the Poincar´
e conjecture and Thurston’s geometrization conjecture have
now been established through the work of Perelman. The confirmation of this
achievement was recognized by a conference at the Institut Henri Poincar´
e in 2010.
This article—based on a lecture at that conference—aims to give a brief and impres-
sionistic introduction to the geometrization conjecture: its historical precedents, the
approaches to its resolution, and some of the remaining open questions. Additional
notes, and references to some of the many works treating these topics in detail, are
collected at the end.
2. Surfaces and tilings
We begin by recalling the geometrization theorem in dimension two.
Theorem
2.1. Any closed, orientable topological surface S can be presented as
a quotient of S
2
,
E
2
or
H
2
by a discrete group of isometries.
Concretely, this means S can be tiled by spherical, Euclidean or hyperbolic
polygons.
Research supported in part by the NSF.
c 2014 Curtis T. McMullen
31

32
CURTIS T. MCMULLEN
Figure 1.
Illustration of Dante’s cosmology by Gustave Dor´
e (1867).
Proof.
By the classification of surfaces, we may assume S is a sphere, a torus,
or a surface of genus g
≥ 2. The theorem is immediate in the first two cases. In
terms of tilings, one can assemble S
2
out of 8 spherical triangles with all angles
90

; and a torus can be tiled by 8 Euclidean squares, which unfold to give the
checkerboard tiling of
E
2
.
Next we observe that a surface of genus g = 2 can be assembled from 8 regular
pentagons (see Figure 2). The right-angled pentagons needed for this tiling do not
exist in spherical or Euclidean geometry, but they do exist in the hyperbolic plane.
Passing to the universal cover S, we obtain a periodic tiling of
H
2
and an isometric
action of the deck group Γ ∼
= π
1
(S) on
H
2
yielding S as its quotient. Any surface
of genus g
≥ 3 covers a surface of genus 2, so it too can be tiled by pentagons—one
just needs more of them.
Figure 2.
Tilings of surfaces of genus 1 and 2.

THE EVOLUTION OF GEOMETRIC STRUCTURES ON 3-MANIFOLDS
33
Uniformization. The geometrization theorem for surfaces was essentially
known to Klein and his contemporaries in the 1870’s, although the classification of
abstract surfaces according to genus, by Dehn and Heegaard, was not proved until
1907. It is definitely more elementary than the uniformization theorem, proved in
the same era, which asserts that every algebraic curve can be analytically parame-
terized by
C, C or H
2
.
The converse is also true, as was shown by Poincar´
e; in particular:
Theorem
2.2. Every compact Riemann surface of the form X =
H
2
/Γ is
isomorphic to an algebraic curve.
For the proof, we need to construct meromorphic functions on X. A natural
approach is to start with any rational function f (z) on the unit disk Δ ∼
=
H
2
, and
then make it invariant by forming the Poincar´
e series
Θ(f ) =
γ
∈Γ
γ

(f ) =
γ
∈Γ
f (γ(z)).
The result can then be regarded as a meromorphic function on X.
Unfortunately this series has no chance of converging: the orbit γ(z) accumu-
lates on points in ∂Δ where f (z) = 0, so the terms in the sum do not even tend to
zero.
However, the sum does converge if we replace the function f (z) with the qua-
dratic differential q = f (z) dz
2
, since then
|q| behaves like an area form, and the
total area near the boundary of the disk is finite. This makes Θ(q) into a mero-
morphic form on X; and ratios of these forms, Θ(q
1
)/Θ(q
2
), then give enough
meromorphic functions to map X to an algebraic curve.
Thus algebra, geometry and topology are mutually compatible in dimension
two.
Poincar´
e’s Θ-operator also plays an unexpected role in the theory of 3-manifolds;
see


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-series-of-the-110.html

the-series-of-the-115.html

the-series-of-the-12.html

the-series-of-the-17.html

the-series-of-the-21.html