1 ... 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ... 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 11

bet11/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.

MANIFOLDS
89
It follows that non-vanishing of the Hopf invariant h
(f) implies that f is non-
homotopic to zero.
For instance, the Hopf map S
3
→ S
2
is non-contractible, since every two
transversal flat dicks D
i
⊂ B
4
⊂ C
2
bounding equatorial circles S
i
⊂ S
3
intersect at
a single point.
The essential point of the seemingly trivial pull-back construction, is that start-
ing from “simple manifolds” X
0
⊂ V and W , we produce complicated and more
interesting ones by means of “complicated maps” W
→ V . (It is next to impossible
to make an interesting manifold with the “equivalence class of atlases” definition.)
For example, if V
= R, and our maps are functions on W , we can generate lots
of them by using algebraic and analytic manipulations with functions and then we
obtain maps to
R
N
by taking N -tuples of functions.
And less obvious (smooth generic) maps, for all kind of V and W , come as
smooth generic approximations of continuous maps W
→ V delivered by the alge-
braic topology.
Following Thom (1954) one applies the above to maps into one point compact-
ifications V

of open manifolds V where one still can speak of generic pullbacks of
smooth submanifolds X
0
in V
⊂ V

under maps W
→ V

Thom spaces. The Thom space of an N -vector bundle V
→ X
0
over a compact
space X
0
(where the pullbacks of all points x
∈ X
0
are Euclidean spaces
R
N
x
= R
N
)
is the one point compactifications V

of V , where X
0
is canonically embedded into
V
⊂ V

as the zero section of the bundle (i.e. x
↦ 0 ∈ R
N
x
).
If X
= X
n
⊂ W = W
n
+N
is a smooth submanifold, then the total space of its
normal bundle denoted U

→ X is (almost canonically) diffeomorphic to a small
(normal) ε-neighbourhood U
(ε) ⊂ W of X, where every ε-ball B
N
(ε) = B
N
x
(ε)
normal to X at x
∈ X is radially mapped to the fiber R
N
= R
N
x
of U

→ X at x.
Thus the Thom space U


is identified with U
(ε)

and the tautological map
W

→ U(ε)

, that equals the identity on U
(ε) ⊂ W and sends the complement W ∖
U
(ε) to ● ∈ U(ε)

, defines the Atiyah–Thom map for all closed smooth submanifold
X
⊂ W ,
A


∶ W

→ U


.
Recall that every
R
N
-bundle over an n-dimensional space with n
< N, can
be induced from the tautological bundle V over the Grassmann manifold X
0
=
Gr
N
(R
n
+N
) of N-planes (i.e. linear N-subspaces in R
n
+N
) by a continuous map,
say G
∶ X → X
0
= Gr
N
(R
n
+N
).
For example, if X
⊂ R
n
+N
, one can take the normal Gauss map for G that sends
x
∈ X to the N-plane G(x) ∈ Gr
N
(R
n
+N
) = X
0
which is parallel to the normal space
of X at x.
Since the Thom space construction is, obviously, functorial, every U

-bundle
inducing map X
→ X
0
= Gr
N
(R
n
+N
) for X = X
n
⊂ W = W
n
+N
, defines a map
U


→ V

and this, composed with A


, gives us the Thom map
T

∶ W

→ V

for the tautological N -bundle V
→ X
0
= Gr
N
(R
n
+N
).
Since all n-manifolds can be (obviously) embedded (by generic smooth maps)
into Euclidean spaces
R
n
+N
, N
>> n, every closed, i.e. compact without boundary,
n-manifold X comes from the generic pullback construction applied to maps f from

90
MIKHAIL GROMOV
S
n
+N
= R
n
+N

to the Thom space V

of the canonical N -vector bundle V
→ X
0
=
Gr
N
(R
n
+N
),
X
= f
−1
(X
0
) for generic f ∶ S
n
+N
→ V

⊃ X
0
= Gr
N
(R
n
+N
).
In a way, Thom has discovered the source of all manifolds in the world and
responded to the question “Where are manifolds coming from?” with the following.
1954
Answer.
All closed smooth n-manifolds X come as pullbacks of the
Grassmannians X
0
= Gr
N
(R
n
+N
) in the ambient Thom spaces V

⊃ X
0
under
generic smooth maps S
n
+N
→ V

.
The manifolds X obtained with the generic pull-back construction come with
a grain of salt: generic maps are abundant but it is hard to put your finger on any
one of them—we cannot say much about topology and geometry of an individual
X. (It seems, one cannot put all manifolds in one basket without some “random
string” attached to it.)
But, empowered with Serre’s theorem, this construction unravels an amazing
structure in the “space of all manifolds” (Before Serre, Pontryagin and following
him Rokhlin proceeded in the reverse direction by applying smooth manifolds to
the homotopy theory via the Pontryagin construction.)
Selecting an object X, e.g. a submanifold, from a given collection
X of similar
objects, where there is no distinguished member X

among them, is a notoriously
difficult problem which had been known since antiquity and can be traced to De
Cael of Aristotle. It reappeared in 14th century as Buridan’s ass problem and as
Zermelo’s choice problem at the beginning of 20th century.
A geometer/analyst tries to select an X by first finding/constructing a “value
function” on
X and then by taking the “optimal” X. For example, one may go for
n-submanifolds X of minimal volumes in an
(n + N)-manifold W endowed with a
Riemannian metric. However, minimal manifolds X are usually singular except for
hypersurfaces X
n
⊂ W
n
+1
where n
≤ 6 (Simons, 1968).
Picking up a “generic” or a “random” X from
X is a geometer’s last resort
when all “deterministic” options have failed. This is aggravated in topology, since
● there is no known construction delivering all manifolds X in a reasonably
controlled manner besides generic pullbacks and their close relatives;
● on the other hand, geometrically interesting manifolds X are not any-
body’s pullbacks. Often, they are “complicated quotients of simple man-
ifolds”, e.g. X
= S/Γ, where S is a symmetric space, e.g. the hyperbolic
n-space, and Γ is a discrete isometry group acting on S, possibly, with
fixed points.
(It is obvious that every surface X is homeomorphic to such a quotient, and this is
also so for compact 3-manifolds by a theorem of Thurston. But if n
≥ 4, one does
not know if every closed smooth manifold X is homeomorphic to such an S
/Γ. It
is hard to imagine that there are infinitely many non-diffeomorphic but mutually
homeomorphic S
/Γ for the hyperbolic 4-space S, but this may be a problem with
our imagination.)
Starting from another end, one has ramified covers X
→ X
0
of “simple” mani-
folds X
0
, where one wants the ramification locus Σ
0
⊂ X
0
to be a subvariety with
“mild singularities” and with an “interesting” fundamental group of the comple-
ment X
0
∖ Σ
0
, but finding such Σ
0
is difficult (see the discussion following (3) in
Section 7).

MANIFOLDS
91
And even for simple Σ
0
⊂ X
0
, the description of ramified coverings X
→ X
0
where X are manifolds may be hard. For example, this is non-trivial for ramified
coverings over the flat n-torus X
0
= T
n
where Σ
0
is the union of several flat
(n−2)-
subtori in general position where these subtori may intersect one another.
4. Duality and the Signature
Cycles and Homology. If X is a smooth n-manifold X one is inclined to
define “geometric i-cycles” C in X, which represent homology classes
[C] ∈ H
i
(X),
as “compact oriented i-submanifolds C
⊂ X with singularities of codimension two”.
This, however, is too restrictive, as it rules out, for example, closed self-
intersecting curves in surfaces, and/or the double covering map S
1
→ S
1
.
Thus, we allow C
⊂ X which may have singularities of codimension one, and,
besides orientation, a locally constant integer valued function on the non-singular
locus of C.
First, we define dimension on all closed subsets in smooth manifolds with the
usual properties of monotonicity, locality and max-additivity, i.e. dim
(A ∪ B) =
max
(dim(A), dim(B)).
Besides we want our dimension to be monotone under generic smooth maps of
compact subsets A, i.e. dim
(f(A)) ≤ dim(A) and if f ∶ X
m
+n
→ Y
n
is a generic
map, then f
−1
(A) ≤ dim(A) + m.
Then we define the “generic dimension” as the minimal function with these
properties which coincides with the ordinary dimension on smooth compact sub-
manifolds. This depends, of course, on specifying “generic” at each step, but this
never causes any problem in-so-far as we do not start taking limits of maps.
An i-cycle C
⊂ X is a closed subset in X of dimension i with a Z-multiplicity
function on C defined below, and with the following set decomposition of C.
C
= C
reg
∪ C
×
∪ C
sing
,
such that
● C
sing
is a closed subset of dimension
≤ i − 2.
● C
reg
is an open and dense subset in C and it is a smooth i-submanifold
in X.
C
×
∪ C
sing
is a closed subset of dimension
≤ i − 1. Locally, at every point, x ∈ C
×
the union C
reg
∪ C
×
is diffeomorphic to a collection of smooth copies of
R
i
+
in X,
called branches, meeting along their
R
i
−1
-boundaries where the basic example is
the union of hypersurfaces in general position.
● The Z-multiplicity structure, is given by an orientation of C
reg
and a locally
constant multiplicity/weight
Z-function on C
reg
, (where for i
= 0 there is
only this function and no orientation) such that the sum of these oriented
multiplicities over the branches of C at each point x
∈ C
×
equals zero.
Every C can be modified to C

with empty C

×
and if codim
(C) ≥ 1, i.e. dim(X) >
dim
(C), also with weights = ±1.
For example, if 2l oriented branches of C
reg
with multiplicities 1 meet at C
×
,
divide them into l pairs with the partners having opposite orientations, keep these
partners attached as they meet along C
×
and separate them from the other pairs.

92
MIKHAIL GROMOV
No matter how simple, this separation of branches is, say with the total weight
2l, it can be performed in l! different ways. Poor C

burdened with this ambiguity
becomes rather non-efficient.
If X is a closed oriented n-manifold, then it itself makes an n-cycle which
represents what is called the fundamental class
[X] ∈ H
n
(X). Other n-cycles are
integer combinations of the oriented connected components of X.
It is convenient to have singular counterparts to manifolds with boundaries.
Since “chains” were appropriated by algebraic topologists, we use the word “plaque”,
where an
(i+1)-plaque D with a boundary ∂(D) ⊂ D is the same as a cycle, except
that there is a subset ∂
(D)
×
⊂ D
×
, where the sums of oriented weights do not cancel,
where the closure of ∂
(D)
×
equals ∂
(D) ⊂ D and where dim(∂(D) ∖ ∂(D)
×
) ≤ i − 2.
Geometrically, we impose the local conditions on D
∖ ∂(D) as on (i + 1)-cycles
and add the local i-cycle conditions on (the closed set) ∂
(D), where this ∂(D)
comes with the canonical weighted orientation induced from D.
(There are two opposite canonical induced orientations on the boundary C
=
∂D, e.g. on the circular boundary of the 2-disc, with no apparent rational for
preferring one of the two. We choose the orientation in ∂
(D) defined by the frames
of the tangent vectors τ
1
, ..., τ
i
such that the orientation given to D by the
(i + 1)-
frames ν, τ
1
, ..., τ
i
agrees with the original orientation, where ν is the inward looking
normal vector.)
Every plaque can be “subdivided” by enlarging the set D
×
(and/or, less essen-
tially, D
sing
). We do not care distinguishing such plaques and, more generally, the
equality D
1
= D
2
means that the two plaques have a common subdivision.
We go further and write D
= 0 if the weight function on D
reg
equals zero.
We denote by
−D the plaque with the either minus weight function or with the
opposite orientation.
We define D
1
+ D
2
if there is a plaque D containing both D
1
and D
2
as its
sub-plaques with the obvious addition rule of the weight functions.
Accordingly, we agree that D
1
= D
2
if D
1
− D
2
= 0.
On genericity. We have not used any genericity so far except for the definition
of dimension. But from now on we assume all our object to be generic. This is
needed, for example, to define D
1
+ D
2
, since the sum of arbitrary plaques is not a
plaque, but the sum of generic plaques, obviously, is.
Also if you are used to genericity, it is obvious to you that
if D
⊂ X is an i-plaque (i-cycle) then the image f(D) ⊂ Y under
a generic map f
∶ X → Y is an i-plaque (i-cycle).
Notice that for dim
(Y ) = i+1 the self-intersection locus of the image f(D) becomes
a part of f
(D)
×
and if dim
(Y ) = i + 1, then the new part the ×-singularity comes
from f
(∂(D)).
It is even more obvious that
the pullback f
−1
(D) of an i-plaque D ⊂ Y
n
under a generic map
f
∶ X
m
+n
→ Y
n
is an
(i + m)-plaque in X
m
+n
; if D is a cycle
and X
m
+n
is a closed manifold (or the map f is proper), then
f
−1
(D) is cycle.
As the last technicality, we extend the above definitions to arbitrary triangu-
lated spaces X, with “smooth generic” substituted by “piecewise smooth generic”
or by piecewise linear maps.

MANIFOLDS
93
Homology. Two i-cycles C
1
and C
2
in X are called homologous, written C
1

C
2
, if there is an
(i + 1)-plaque D in X × [0, 1], such that ∂(D) = C
1
× 0 − C
2
× 1.
For example every contractible cycle C
⊂ X is homologous to zero, since the
cone over C in Y
= X × [0, 1] corresponding to a smooth generic homotopy makes
a plaque with its boundary equal to C.
Since small subsets in X are contractible, a cycle C
⊂ X is homologous to zero
if and only if it admits a decomposition into a sum of “arbitrarily small cycles”, i.e.
if, for every locally finite covering X
= ⋃
i
U
i
, there exist cycles C
i
⊂ U
i
, such that
C
= ∑
i
C
i
.
The homology group H
i
(X) is defined as the Abelian group with generators
[C] for all i-cycles C in X and with the relations [C
1
]−[C
2
] = 0 whenever C
1
∼ C
2
.
Similarly one defines H
i
(X; Q), for the field Q of rational numbers, by allowing
C and D with fractional weights.
Example.
Every closed orientable n-manifold X with k connected components
has H
n
(X) = Z
k
, where H
n
(X) is generated by the fundamental classes of its
components.
This is obvious with our definitions since the only plaques D in X
× [0, 1] with

(D) ⊂ ∂(X × [0, 1]) = X × 0 ∪ X × 1 are combination of the connected components
of X
× [0, 1] and so H
n
(X) equals the group of n-cycles in X. Consequently,
every closed orientable manifold X is non-contractible.
The above argument may look suspiciously easy, since it is even hard to prove
non-contractibility of S
n
and issuing from this the Brouwer fixed point theorem
within the world of continuous maps without using generic smooth or combinatorial
ones, except for n
= 1 with the covering map R → S
1
and for S
2
with the Hopf
fibration S
3
→ S
2
.
The catch is that the difficulty is hidden in the fact that a generic image of an
(n + 1)-plaque (e.g. a cone over X) in X × [0, 1] is again an (n + 1)-plaque. What
is obvious, however, without any appeal to genericity is that H
0
(X) = Z
k
for every
manifold or a triangulated space with k components.
The spheres S
n
have H
i
(S
n
) = 0 for 0 < i < n, since the complement to a point
s
0
∈ S
n
is homeomorphic to
R
n
and a generic cycles of dimension
< n misses s
0
,
while
R
n
, being contractible, has zero homologies in positive dimensions.
It is clear that continuous maps f
∶ X → Y , when generically perturbed, define
homomorphisms f
∗i
∶ H
i
(X) → H
i
(Y ) for C ↦ f(C) and that
homotopic maps f
1
, f
2
∶ X → Y induce equal homomorphisms
H
i
(X) → H
i
(Y ).
Indeed, the cylinders C
× [0, 1] generically mapped to Y × [0, 1] by homotopies f
t
,
t
∈ [0, 1], are plaque D in our sense with ∂(D) = f
1
(C) − f
2
(C). It follows, that
homology is invariant under homotopy equivalences X
↔ Y for
manifolds X, Y as well as for triangulated spaces.
Similarly, if f
∶ X
m
+n
→ Y
n
is a proper (pullbacks of compact sets are compact)
smooth generic map between manifolds where Y has no boundary, then the pull-
backs of cycles define homomorphism, denoted, f
!
∶ H
i
(Y ) → H
i
+m
(X), which is
invariant under proper homotopies of maps.
The homology groups are much easier do deal with than the homotopy groups,
since the definition of an i-cycle in X is purely local, while “spheres in X” cannot

94
MIKHAIL GROMOV
be recognized by looking at them point by point. (Holistic philosophers must feel
triumphant upon learning this.)
Homologically speaking, a space is the sum of its parts: the locality allows an
effective computation of homology of spaces X assembled of simpler pieces, such as
cells, for example.
The locality+additivity is satisfied by the generalized homology functors that
are defined, following Sullivan, by limiting possible singularities of cycles and plaques
[6]. Some of these, e.g. bordisms we meet in the next section.
Definition.
Degree of a map. Let f
∶ X → Y be a smooth (or piece-wise
smooth) generic map between closed connected oriented equidimensional manifolds
Then the degree deg
(f) can be (obviously) equivalently defined either as the image
f

[X] ∈ Z = H
n
(Y ) or as the f
!
-image of the generator
[●] ∈ H
0
(Y ) ∈ Z = H
0
(X).
For, example, l-sheeted covering maps X
→ Y have degrees l. Similarly, one
sees that
finite covering maps between arbitrary spaces are surjective on
the rational homology groups.
To understand the local geometry behind the definition of degree, look closer at our
f where X (still assumed compact) is allowed a non-empty boundary and observe
that the f -pullback ˜
U
y
⊂ X of some (small) open neighbourhood U
y
⊂ Y of a generic
point y
∈ Y consists of finitely many connected components ˜
U
i
⊂ ˜
U , such that the
map f
∶ ˜
U
i
→ U
y
is a diffeomorphism for all ˜
U
i
.
Thus, every ˜
U
i
carries two orientations: one induced from X and the second
from Y via f . The sum of
+1 assigned to ˜
U
i
where the two orientation agree and
of
−1 when they disagree is called the local degree deg
y
(f).
If two generic points y
1
, y
2
∈ Y can be joined by a path in Y which does not cross
the f -image f
(∂(X)) ⊂ Y of the boundary of X, then deg
y
1
(f) = deg
y
2
(f) since the
f -pullback of this path, (which can be assumed generic) consists, besides possible
closed curves, of several segments in Y , joining
±1-degree points in f
−1
(y
1
) ⊂ ˜
U
y
1

X with
∓1-points in f
−1
(y
2
) ⊂ ˜
U
y
2
.
Consequently, the local degree does not depend on y if X has no boundary.
Then, clearly, it coincides with the homologically defined degree.
Similarly, one sees in this picture (without any reference to homology) that the
local degree is invariant under generic homotopies F
∶ X × [0, 1] → Y , where the
smooth (typically disconnected) pull-back curve F
−1
(y) ⊂ X × [0, 1] joins ±1-points
in F
(x, 0)
−1
(y) ⊂ X = X × 0 with ∓1-points in F (x, 1)
−1
(y) ⊂ X = X × 1.
Geometric versus algebraic cycles. Let us explain how the geometric def-
inition matches the algebraic one for triangulated spaces X.
Recall that the homology of a triangulated space is algebraically defined with
Z-cycles which are Z-chains, i.e. formal linear combinations C
alg
= ∑
s
k
s
Δ
i
s
of
oriented i-simplices Δ
i
s
with integer coefficients k
s
, where, by the definition of


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-series-of-the-26.html

the-series-of-the-30.html

the-series-of-the-35.html

the-series-of-the-4.html

the-series-of-the-44.html