1 ... 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 ... 85

the power supply frequency - On phenomena in ionized gases

bet37/85
Sana24.01.2018
Hajmi9.74 Mb.

the power supply frequency

 

4. Acknowledgments 

This  work  is  supported  by  CNES.  L.  Dubois 

benefits from a PhD fellowship from the University 

of Toulouse. 

 

5. References  

 [1]  J.P.  Boeuf,  J.  Appl.  Phys.  

121

,  011101 

(2017) 


 [2]  J.  Arancibia  Monreal,  P.  Chabert,  and  V. 

Godyak, Phys. Plasmas 

20

, 103504 (2013).

 

Topic  number  8 

173


XXXIII ICPIG, July 9-14, 2017, Estoril/Lisbon, Portugal 

   

 Simulation Study of Radio Frequency Capacitively Coupled  

CF

4

 Plasma Discharge – Hollow Cathode Effect 

 

Chia-Yu Chen and Keh-Chyang Leou 

  Engineering and System Science Department, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, R. O. C  

 

Capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) sources have been widely used for material processing. In this study, 

carbon  tetrafluoride  (CF

4

)  CCP  discharges  have  been  investigated  by  fluid  model  numerical  simulations 

(CFD-ACE+, ESI Corp.).  The simulation model takes into account 12 gaseous species and 41 reactions, and 

the discharge is generated by a 27 MHz radio frequency power. Simulation results show that, for typical 

operation conditions the electron density is around 10

15

 - 10

16

 1/m


3

 while the electron temperature is about 2 

- 4 eV in the bulk plasma.   The effect of a trench on the grounded electrode is also investigated.   For a trench 

of dimensions smaller than 6 mm x 12 mm, simulation results reveal that there is a significant modification 

the spatial profile of the plasma density and flux density of important reactive species, as a result of the 

hollow cathode effect. 

 

1. Introduction

 

Capacitively  coupled  plasma  (CCP)  sources 

driven  by  radio  frequency  power  have  been  widely 

used  for  material  processing,  e.g.,  dry  etching, 

plasma  enhanced  chemical  vapor  deposition 

(PECVD),  and  physical  and  reactive  sputtering 

processes[1].  There  have  been  also  a  great  of 

interests to take the advantage of the plasma density 

enhancement by the   hollow  cathode    effect  to  find 

tune the CCP discharge characteristics [2, 3]. In this 

study,  numerical  simulation  analysis  based  on  2D 

fluid model (CFD-ACE+, ESI Corp) is carried out to 

investigate  the  effect  of  a  trench  in  the  grounded 

electrode of a 27 MHz CCP discharge.  Both Argon 

(Ar)  and  Carbon  tetrafluoride  (CF

4

)  plasmas  have 

been  investigated  for  two  structures,  with  and 

without trench.  

 

2. Simulation results

 

Figure 1 shows the spatial distributions for basic 

plasma  parameters,  such  as  electron  density,  F  and 

CF

3

+

 number densities, for CF

4

 CCP discharges of the 

two  different  structures.  Figure  2  shows  radial 

profiles for electron density at the center of the gap 

and  the  F  flux  incident  on  the  powered  electrode 

surface  for  the  two  cases.  It  is  evident  that,  for  the 

trench  of  dimension  6  mm  x  12  mm,  the  density 

profiles  of  the  important  species  become  strongly 

modified by the presence of the trench, as a result of 

the  hollow  cathode  effect.      It  is  also  interesting  to 

note that the F flux density is enhanced by the hollow 

cathode  effect  by  a  factor  ~2  for  the  entire  radial 

profile,  although  the  enhancement  for  the  electron 

density  occurs  only  at  position  beneath  the  trench.   

Simulation  results  also  show  that  the  effect  of  the 

trench is minimal for trenches of widths less than 4 

mm.    This  is  because  the  trench  dimension  would 

need to be greater than two times the sheath width for 

the hollow cathode enhancement to be effective[4]. 

 

Fig.  1

.  Simulation  results  for  The  spatial  profiles  of  (a) 

electron  density  (b)  F

 

  number  density  (c)  CF

3

+

  number 

density, for the case without (left) and with (right) trench.  

 

Fig.  2.

  Simulation  results:  radial  profiles  for  (a)The 

electron  density  at  gap  center,  and  (b)  F

 

  flux  density 

arriving on powered electrode surface.

  

 

3. References 

[1]  M.  A.  Lieberman.  and  A.  J.  Lichtenberg., 

"Principles  of  Plasma  Discharges  and  Materials 

Processing, Processing," (1994). 

[2] T. Tabuchi, H. Mizukami, et al., J. Vac. Sci. 

Technol. A 22 (2004) 

[3] Y. Ohtsu, et al., Phys. Plasmas. 23 (2016) 

[4]  Y. Ohtsu, et al., J. Appl. Phys. 113 (2013). 

 

  

Topic number: 5 

Al-base

 

174



XXXIII ICPIG, July 9-14, 2017, Estoril/Lisbon, Portugal 

   

Plasma activated water – stability and antimicrobial effect

 

 

I.E.Vlad

1

P

, C. Martin

U

1

P

, A.R. Toth

2

P

, J. Papp

P

2

, S.D.Anghel

1

 

  1 Faculty of Physics, Babeș-Bolyai University, M. Kogălniceanu 1, Cluj-Napoca 400084, Romania  2 Faculty of Biology and Geology, Babeș-Bolyai University, Republicii 44, Cluj-Napoca 400015, Romania 

 

The  interface  region  between  plasma  and  water  based  liquids  offers  the  perfect  conditions  for 

active  chemical  species  like  hydrogen  peroxide,  hydroxyl  radical,  nitrites  and  nitrates  to  be 

generated. The so formed molecules further diffuse in the treated samples, changing their physical 

and chemical properties. The current work records the changes induced by a He/Ar 

-jet discharge 

on  distilled  water  samples.  The  electrical  conductivity,  pH  value,  nitric  acid  concentration  and 

hydrogen  peroxide  concentration are measured immediately after treatment and for time intervals 

up  to  21  days.  A  good  stability  of  the  plasma  activated  water  can  be  observed.  Furthermore,  the 

antimicrobial  effect  of  the  plasma  activated  water  is  proved.  The  effects  of  the  discharge  gas, 

treatment time as well as storage time are all investigated. 

 

1. Introduction

 

When  plasmas  and  liquids  interact,  at  the 

interface  region  between  the  two  media  specific 

chemical  processes  occur,  producing  modifications 

of the physical and chemical attributes of the liquids 

[1].  The  so  activated  liquids  have  proven  to  hold 

special  properties  offering  them  the  possibility  of 

acting  as  chemical  agents  in  several  biological 

processes  [1].  The  current  work  proposes  the 

application  of  plasma  activated  water  (PAW)  in 

bacterial  decontamination  and  investigates  the  time 

evolution  of  the  PAW  characteristics  as  well  as  its 

antimicrobial character. 

  

2. Experimental details and results 

2.1. Water activation  

The  water  activation  by  plasma  treatment 

experiments  were  carried  out  using  a  low 

temperature  atmospheric  pressure 

-jet  setup.  It 

consists of a powered electrode (vertical needle - 0.6 

mm  i.d.,  supplied  with  at  a  sinusoidal  voltage  -  1.7 

kV, 10.2 MHz) through which the discharge gas (He 

or  Ar)  is  flown  at  a  0.3  l/min  rate.  The  distilled 

water  samples  are  placed  3  mm  below  the  needle. 

The  discharge  is  formed  in  the  space  between  the 

electrode  and  the  surface  of  the  liquid.  The 

treatment  time  intervals  are  up  to  50  minutes.  The 

physical  and  chemical  properties  of  the  PAW 

samples were measured immediately after treatment 

and  for  time  intervals  up  to  21  days.  During  this 

period the samples were stored in closed containers 

at room temperature. 

The pH, electrical conductivity,  H

2

O 2

 and HNO

3

 

concentrations  change  strongly  with  the  treatment 

time. After 50 minutes of treatment using the helium 

discharge  the  obtained  values  are:  1.79  pH  units, 

1747 


S/cm,  0.9  mM  H

2

O 2

  and  3.6  mM  HNO

3

Also,  the  discharge  gas  plays  a  substantial  role  in 

determining  the  final  properties  of  the  PAW 

samples. In the case of the Ar discharge, for the 50 

minutes treatment time, the resulted quantities were: 

2.19 pH units, 1269 

S/cm, 1.19 mM H

2

O

2

 and 2.6 

mM  HNO


3

.  The  analysis  of  the  water  properties 

with the storage time revealed that the properties of 

the PAW remain stable in time for at least 21 days. 

For samples treated for 50 minutes with the He 

-jet 

the measured values after 21 days are: 1.9 pH units, 

1820 


S/cm, 0.8 mM H

2

O 2

 and 3.6 mM HNO

3

.  

 

2.2. Bacterial decontamination

 

The  antimicrobial  effect  of  the  PAW  samples 

was  investigated  using  Staphylococcus  aureus 

(S.aureus)  as  test  microorganism.  An  overnight 

bacterial culture grown in nutrient broth media was 

incubated  for  24  hours  with  PAW  in  1:1  volume 

ratios  of  growth  media  and  PAW.  The  growth 

inhibition  effect  of  PAW  was  estimated  by 

measuring  the  optical  density  of  the  bacterial 

suspension  at  620  nm.  Control  samples  of  bacteria 

incubated  with  1:1  volume  ratios  of  nutrient  broth 

and distilled water and samples without dilutions of 

the nutrient broth were used. 

The  effects  of  the  water  treatment  time, 

discharge  gas  and  storage  time  were  investigated. 

The  PAW  shows  strong  antimicrobial  effects.  The 

S.aureus  sample  incubated  with  the  50  minutes 

helium  discharge  treated  water  shows  an  OD  value 

of 0.09 a.u. while the water control sample shows an 

OD  value  of  0.17  a.u.,  results  that  demonstrate  a 

significant influence of the PAW. 

 

3. References 

[1]  P.J.  Bruggeman  et  al.,  Plasma  Sources  Sci.  Technol., 

25

, 5, (2016) 53002. 

17 


175

XXXIII ICPIG, July 9-14, 2017, Estoril/Lisbon, Portugal 

   

Theoretical study on plasma pattern formation and propagation during air 

breakdown by three intersecting microwave beams 

 

 

Qianhong Zhou, Zhiwei Dong, Wei Yang 

  Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing, China

 

 

Air  breakdown  by  three  intersecting  high  power  microwave  (HPM)  beams  is  investigated  by 

numerical solution of fluid-based plasmas equations coupled with the Maxwell equations. For three 

coherently  intersecting  HPM  beams,  interference-field  maxima  (form  a  triangular  lattice)  and 

minima are created in the intersecting region. The collisional cascade breakdown occurs only if the 

initial free electron appears or arrives in the vicinity of field maxima, where the free electron can be 

accelerated. A ball-like plasmoid grows around a field maximum (if there are seed electrons) until its 

density becomes large enough to diffract the incident field. When the plasma density is larger enough, 

it scatters the three waves and redistributes the interference pattern. Diffusion and ionization in the 

closest  maximum  field  leads  to  the  formation  of  new  plasmoids.  As  time  increases,  the  new 

plasmoids will form regular patterns and the plasma region enlarges. 

 

   

1. Introduction 

 

Microwave  air  breakdown  has  been  extensively 

investigated since the 1940s. Previously, microwave 

air  breakdown  induced  by  single  high  power 

microwave 

(HPM) 


beam 

has 


been 

widely 


investigated[1-5].    However,  relatively  few  studies 

existed on microwave air breakdown by intersecting 

microwave  beams.  Actually,  two  or  more  HPM 

beams are needed to satisfy the power requirement of 

applications.  For  example,  many  HPM  beams  are 

sent to the atmosphere with the help of ground-based 

antennas,  in  the  beam  crossing  region,  where  the 

electric field is particularly large, a gas discharge is 

set up, i.e. an artificial ionized layer is formed. 

In order to successfully use the air breakdown by 

crossing  beams,  it  is  necessary  to  have  a  clear 

understanding of which processes are involved and to 

what extent.   Recently, we have studied  microwave 

air  breakdown  in  the  region  of  two  intersecting 

waves[6,7].  The  plasma  pattern  formation  and 

propagation  by  two  waves  is  different  from  that  by 

single wave. 

In this paper, Air breakdown by three intersecting 

HPM beams is investigated by numerical solution of 

fluid-based  plasmas  equations  coupled  with  the 

Maxwell  equations.  The  detailed  plasma  pattern 

formation  and  propagation  is  investigated  for 

different incident angles. 

 

2. References

 

[1] Q. Zhou, Z. Dong, Appl. Phys. Lett. 98(2011), 

161504. 


[2] J. P. Boeuf, B. Chaudhury, G. Q. Zhu, Phys. 

Rev. Lett. 104(2010) 015002 

[3] S. K. Nam, J. P. Verboncoeur, Phys. Rev. Lett. 

103(2009) 55004 

[4] A. Cook, M. Shapiro, R. Temkin, Appl. Phys. 

Lett. 97(2010) 011504 

[5]  V.  E.  Semenov,  E.  I.  Rakova,  M.  Yu. 

Glyavin,G.  S.  Nusinovich,  Phys.  Plasma,  23(2016) 

073109 

[6] Q.  Zhou,  Z.  Dong,  Acta  Phys.  Sin.  62(2013) 

205202 

[7]  Q.  Zhou,  Z.  Dong,  Pulsed  Power&  Plasma 

Science Conference, San Francisco, CA June 16-21, 

2013


 

Topic number 9 

176

XXXIII ICPIG, July 9-14, 2017, Estoril/Lisbon, Portugal 

   

Production and study of a plasma confined by a dipole magnet: optical 

emission spectroscopy and electron energy distribution  

 

Anuj Ram Baitha, Ashwani Kumar and Sudeep Bhattacharjee 

  Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh: 208016   

We report a table top experiment to investigate important physical processes in a plasma confined 

by a dipole magnet. A strong water cooled cylindrical permanent magnet, is employed to create the 

dipole  field  inside  a  vacuum  chamber.  The  plasma  is  created  by  electron  cyclotron  resonance 

heating, using microwaves of 2.45 GHz. Visual observations (in terms of digital images) of the first 

plasma,  including  results of  measurements of plasma parameters such as ion density and electron 

temperature, optical emission spectroscopy and electron energy distribution will be presented in the 

conference. 

 

1. Introduction 

 

Studies  on  the  properties  of  a  plasma 

confined  by  a  dipole  magnet  has  been  of  great 

interest in plasma physics, since a long time [1–

2].  The  dipole  confinement  concept  was 

motivated 

by  spacecraft  observations 

of 


planetary  magnetospheres  [3-4].  It  is  of  interest 

to  investigate  such  a  confinement  scheme  and 

resulting  plasma  behaviour  in  the  laboratory. 

There  have  been  large  experiments  using 

superconducting  coils  to  understand  underlying 

complex  plasma  processes  in  the  dipole  plasma 

[3-4].

   In  this  work  we  report  a  compact  table  top 

experiment  using  a  permanent  magnet  to 

investigate  the  properties  of  a  plasma  confined 

by a dipole magnet.  

2. Experimental set up 

In  the  present  experiment,  we  employ  a 

strong  permanent  magnet,  having  a  surface 

magnetic  field  of  ~  6000  Gauss  to  create  the 

dipole magnetic field.

 

The magnet is suspended 

in  free  space  from  a  top  flange  in  a  vacuum 

chamber and cooled by circulating chilled water. 

The  plasma  is  heated  by  electron  cyclotron 

resonance,  using  microwaves  of  2.45  GHz  and 

results in a beta of ~ 2%. The beta can be further 

increased by using dual frequency heating in the 

range  6  –  11  GHz  using  a  traveling  wave  tube 

amplifier  (TWTA),  available  in  the  laboratory. 

The  wave  powers  can  be  widely  varied  from  a 

few  hundred  watts  (~  300  W)  in  the CW mode 

to a few kilo watts (~ 7 kW) in the pulsed mode 

of  operation.  A

  schematic  of  the  experimental 

setup is shown in Fig. 1.

  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure  1.  Schematic  of  the  experimental  setup  SSC: 

Straight  Section,  ISO:    Isolator,  MWG:  Microwave 

Generator. 

3. Results 

 

The  dipole  plasma  has  been  successfully 

created  and  the  resulting  plasma  density  and 

electron  temperature  have  been  measured  in  the 

radial direction. In addition, we have 

measured the 

temperature  anisotropy  of  the  plasma  in  a 

direction parallel and perpendicular to the static 

magnetic field.  We find that  the plasma density 

is  peaked  a  few  centimetres  away  from  the 

magnet and decreases as we go radially outward. 

The peak plasma density is ~ 1.8×10

11

 cm


-3

 and 


the electron temperature lies in the range 3 – 14 

eV.  In  addition,  optical  emission  spectroscopy 

and  electron  energy  distribution  function 

measurements  will  be  presented  in  the 

conference. 

4. References 

[1]  Hasegawa,  Comments  Plasma  Phys.  Controlled 

Fusion 

1,

 147 (1987) 

[2] Birmingham, T. J., Geophys. Res. 

74

, 2169-2181 

(1969) 

[3] Yue Chen, Geoffrey D. Reeves & Reiner H. W. 

Friedel, Nature Physics 

3

, 614 - 617 (2007)  

[4]  A.C  Boxer,  R.  Bergmann,  J.L.Ellsworth,  D.T 

Garnier,  J.Kesner,  M.E  Mauel  and  P.Woskov.   

Nature Physics 

6

, 207-212 (2010) 

To pump

 

Vacuum chamber

 

SSC

 

tunner

 

Directional 

coupler

 

 

ISO 

Plasma

 

MWG

 

2.45 GHz

 

Measurement

 

 Unit 

 

Probe

 

Quartz window 

Dipole magnet 

 

Water 

IN

 

Water 

OUT

 

Signal Gen

 

TWTA

 

(6-18 GHz)

 

177


XXXIII ICPIG, July 9-14, 2017, Estoril/Lisbon, Portugal 

   

Tuning the wettability of metallic surfaces by microwave plasma generated 

low energy noble gas ion beams  

 

 

S. Chatterjee and 

U

S. Bhattacharjee

UPP

   

Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh: 208016, India

 

 

Metallic  thin  films  of  Cu  have  been  irradiated  with  different  inert  gas  ions  (Ar

+

,  Kr

+

,  Ne


+

generated by an intense microwave plasma, in order to look at the changes in wetting behaviour of 

such  irradiated  films.  Special  attention  is  devoted  to  look  at  the  static  contact  angle  and  contact 

angle hysteresis. Observations reveal an increasing trend of static, advancing and receding contact 

angles, indicating that the irradiation process precipitates a reduction in surface free energy which 

has been related to a change in dispersive intermolecular interaction due to implantation of noble 

gaseous  elements  with  varying  polarizability.  The  nanoscale  roughness  generated  by  this  process 

has  no  impact  on  the  static  contact  angle.  However,  the  nominal  hysteresis  created  may  be 

attributed to the roughness according to Johanny-de Gennes theory.     

 

1. Introduction:

 

Wettability is an important surface phenomena of 

a  solid  surface  that  is  determined  by  the  adhesive 

intermolecular forces between a solid and the liquid 

in contact [1]. Where there are conventional ways to 

tune  wettability  by  engineering  the  surface 

roughness  (the  Wenzel  regime),  chemical  texturing 

(Cassie-  Baxter  regime),  and  coating  or  by  forming 

functionalized  chemical  groups,  the  present  study 

looks  at  the  possibility  of  controlling  wetting 

behaviour of metallic surfaces (Cu) by implantation 

of  inert  gas  molecules  (

Ar

+

,  Kr

+

,  Ne

+

)  in  the  near 

surface  atomic  layers.  Since  inert  gas  molecules  do 

not form any chemical bond with metal, the system 

thus formed is heterogeneous in atomic length scales 

and  hence  has  been  termed  as  “atomically 

heterogeneous” system.    



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-sirens-of-titan---2.html

the-sirens-of-titan---7.html

the-sirens-of-titan.html

the-sixth-international.html

the-skilful-mind-and-body.html